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William Hennessy

Co-founder of St. Louis Tea Party Coalition and Nationwide Chicago Tea Party Persuasive design expert Latest book: Turning On Trump: An Evolution (2016) Author of The Conservative Manifest (1993), Zen Conservatism (2009), Weaving the Roots (2011), and Fight to Evolve (2016) I believe every person deserves the dignity of meaningful work as the only path to human flourishing.

Welcome to the America of Our Dreams

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Jim Durbin called me this evening. “Are you excited?” he asked.

Jim was in the crowd at the very first Tea Party in St. Louis, February 27, 2009. A cold Friday. He and more than a thousand other folks took off work and school to see what this protest was all about. Like so many others, Jim knew America needed a change. A big one. A change built on the hopes and dreams and fierce independence of ordinary people. We could no longer trust America’s future to academics and political professionals.

“Excited bout what?” I asked.

“The inauguration tomorrow,” he said.

I’d almost forgotten. Between my never-ending cold and work and family and the Blues’ lackluster home play, so many other things compete for my brain time. I felt bad that I didn’t feel better. Which reminded me of a story we read in 7th grade (was it 7th?) about Christmas spirit and a little kid who didn’t have any.

The kid in that Christmas story was struck by Christmas spirit on Christmas eve. My epiphany struck when I opened some old emails.

These emails were responses to a “thank you” email I sent to Tea Partiers in November. My email thanked them for being part of the movement that culminated in a 1,000 seat shift from Democrats to Republics since 2009 at all levels of state and federal government including, now, the seat in the Oval Office. That email was to thank the people like Jim who no longer trusted academics and professionals to chart a course for America’s future.

As Donald Trump prepares to take office as our 45th President and the first of a kind, I thought I’d share a few of your words with the world. You say it better than I ever could:

Don’t you see that the Tea Party was the precursor of Donald Trump’s election? We laid the groundwork with all those rallies and protests and afterparties.  If Trump is faithful to his word and follows through with his promises to us, the ideals that we struggled for will come to fruition. Back in April of 2009 when I went to the Kiener Plaza rally, I KNEW that the Tea Party would be an historic movement, that we could make a difference.  God bless you and, yes, Dana too, for helping us to take America back. God bless Donald Trump and God Bless America! — Donna R.

It finally feels good after all these past 8 years. God bless you Bill. — Edward H.

I heard someone recently say what happened to the Tea Party and I said we are the Tea Party.  You were such a prominent part of the entire movement.  Thank you for the reminders.  I have a photo album with many of the events.  I truly feel like there is a dark cloud removed from our future.  However, we can never take this great country for granted.  God has answered our prayers and now we need to be worthy.  Thank you for all the passion there is no replacement and money cannot buy it. –Jane P.

Some of us have complained or protested when someone implied that the Tea Party is dead. I don’t think it was ever dead – it went underground and that’s where it continued its mission of upsetting the apple card and unconventional methods of doing things the unconventional way.

Thanks for recognizing that MAGA is and was the ultimate goal of the Tea Party. –Frieda K.

God Bless America and please make it great again! –Judy H.

I received dozens of other notes that mistakenly thanked me. I really didn’t do much, but I appreciate your kind support and kind words.

Shakespeare said, “It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.” Fifteen hours from the moment I write these words, the Tea Party’s dream will rendezvous with its hard-earned destiny. That destiny, far too big for one man to contain, will nonetheless be personified by Donald J. Trump.

On this last night of America’s dark winter, I will tell you that Mr. Trump said it best when he told the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial tonight:

I had something to do with it but you had much more to do with it than I did. I’m the messenger. I’m just the messenger. And we were tired, and I love you. Believe me, I love you.

Thank you, friends. I look forward to laying down our tools of protest so we can pick up hammers and shovels and get to work Making America Great Again!

America’s Business is Jobs, Not College

Reading Time: 4 minutes

Many of us are guilty. I am, too. You, probably.

In high school (and after) we mocked the kids who took shop. The “greasers” who got credit for wrenching on cars or welding or making cabinets. It was the 1980s and shop, along with home economics, became an elective in most schools.

Until the 80s, some practical life skill class was a requirement at most American public and parochial high schools. Only prep schools let students slide. But in the 1980s—perhaps influenced by the satire book “The Official Preppy Handbook,” schools across the socio-economic spectrum dropped shop from the mandatory list. Some dropped it altogether. At that point, kids who signed up for shop were signing up for blue collar work. They were hand-raisers for the mockers.

Cultural contempt for people who do actual work only increased in the three decades since shop became a dirty word. Movies, television, novels, comedians make fun of the people who build their homes, build and repair their cars, program their computers. put out their fires, fix their leaky toilets, and paint their walls. The smirking class scoffs at guys who take a shower at the end of their workdays.

At the same time, American culture has all but made a 4-year college degree mandatory. From Presidents of the United States to high school principals, the people we’re told to respect show little or no respect for the vast majority whose highest education ended in a prom. Yet, from the President on down, we depend far more on those who know how to make things than on those who “stare at their feet and think great thoughts,” as legendary Ohio State football coach Woody Hayes once said.

The Post-Dispatch points out, there’s no incentive for schools produce great workers:

Public schools, meanwhile, are judged by test scores and the percent of students they send to college. Guidance counselors aren’t likely to push young people toward the plant gates.

Today, America has a glut of college-educated pizza deliverers and a shortage of forty-dollar-an-hour machinists and electricians. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch highlights the shortage of skilled labor in St. Louis:

Factories around St. Louis can find plenty of people for grunt jobs — lifting boxes, sorting parts and such. They have a much tough[er] time finding hands-on machinists, computer numerical control, or CNC, machine operators, toolmakers, industrial electricians, multi-skilled maintenance mechanics and other jobs that require math talent and a couple of years of schooling.

A recent national survey of association members found that 90 percent have moderate or serious trouble finding qualified employees.

So, jobs paying $20, $25 and sometimes $40 an hour are going unfilled.

If you think the skilled-labor shortage is an argument for open borders, you’d be very wrong. Skilled workers in Central America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East lead decent lives in their countries. Unless driven out by war or cartel violence, skilled workers don’t migrate illegally into the US–grunt workers do, the kind of workers America already finds in abundance.

A lot of those grunt workers are recent college graduates. CareerBuilder.com found in a 2014 study that 51 percent of college graduates are working in jobs that don’t require degrees. ZeroHedge.com found one (click here for full story):

Andrea Ledesma, 28, says her parents owned a house and were raising kids by her age. Not so for her.

Ledesma graduated from college four years ago. After moving through a series of jobs, she now earns $18,000 making pizza at Classic Slice in Milwaukee, shares a two-bedroom apartment with her boyfriend and has $33,000 in student debt.

“That’s not at all how life is now, that’s not something that people strive for and it’s not something that is even attainable, and I thought it would be at this point,” Ledesma said.

Her mother Cheryl Romanowski, 55, was making about $10,000 a year at her age working at a bank without a college education. In today’s dollars, that income would be equal to roughly $19,500. Romanowski said she envies the choices that her daughter has in life, but she acknowledged that her daughter has it harder than her. “I think the opportunities have just been fading away,” she said.

Had Andrea opted for machine shop class instead of college, she’d now have 8 years of seniority as a machinist earning somewhere between $60,000 and $80,000 a year. It’s unlikely she will find a job that requires her degree that will make up for the 8 years she lost in college and dead-end jobs.

While it’s true that the aggregate of those with college degrees earns more than the aggregate of those without, that statistic is deceiving. The college-educated number skews high because of ridiculously high salaries of a few. Skilled laborers without degrees are huddled together in a narrower range of salaries. In other words, the gap between a senior machinist and a Fortune 1000 CEO is way bigger than the gap between the machinist and the liberal arts major who sells pizzas.

Further, the college-educated pool includes all levels of education: doctors, lawyers, PhDs, etc. It’s not just those with a 4-year degree and no more. Plus, we don’t need as many Ph.D. historians as we need skilled machinists and electricians. The Department of Labor says only about 1/3 of American jobs require any education beyond high school.

So where do we go from here?

I think America’s attitude about real work is about to change. Donald Trump won on the strength of people who work for a living. To a large extent, so did Eric Greitens here in Missouri. So the people in power owe a big debt to the people who shower after work. Meanwhile, a growing number college-educated young people—the key demographic for advertisers and entertainment producers—can’t afford the products advertised on TV and Facebook. (Products made by people who took shop.) Smart marketers and television writers will soon realize that the actual key demographic in America is young skilled workers, not just young people in general.

As the leftist hysteria over 2016’s election quiets down (and it will), expect to see growing respect and appreciation for the people who work in blue-collar jobs. As college tuition continues to rise faster than inflation and faster than healthcare costs, expect taxpayers to demand that Congress slam the brakes on higher education spending. Some of that money will go to pay the debt, but some tax money can be returned to the states to expand shop classes.

Making America great again requires that America make things again—things that last longer than a pizza or an Old Fashioned cocktail. The jobs that Trump has promised need people who can lift a load and do the math. As one employer told the Post-Dispatch:

He’s picked new high school graduates, hoping to train them, but often found they lack basic skills. “It’s basically all math and hard labor. I have had kids that make the effort, but they don’t have the brain power.”

Calvin Coolidge said, “the business of America is business.” That was almost 100 years ago. Today, the business of America is jobs.

Let’s get to work.

Stan Kroenke’s Long Con Has Just Started

Reading Time: 3 minutes

You thought Stan Kroenke wanted a team in Los Angeles? I don’t think so. I think Stan is playing a long con. And I think it’s a brilliant strategy.

Los Angeles is a terrible market for football teams, but it’s a fantastic market for the NFL. It would be a perfect place to build a permanent home for the Super Bowl. Los Angeles has fantastic weather, great attractions, and a huge pool of football fans, fans of every team in the NFL. Except the Rams.

And you might think I’m crazy, but you’ll want to bookmark this post for later reference. It could make you look very smart some day.

Let’s look at what we know about Kroenke, the Rams, and the NFL.

  1. Kroenke is a real estate investor who happens to own a few professional sports teams. He made his billions building strip malls that he rented to Walmart and other retailers. (The Walmart plaza by my house is a Kroenke Properties mall.) His first love is real estate deals, and he’s shady.
  2. Many people who’ve done business with Kroenke were financially ruined. Kroenke always sets up the deals so he can take everything when he wants. Just ask St. Louis.
  3. The NFL is about money and only about money. Just ask any of the former NFL players who have to beg for money from their wheelchairs like Conrad Dobler.
  4. The NFL wants a team in London, and they want it soon.
  5. Stan Kroenke wanted the Rams to play numerous games in London while they were in St. Louis, but the team’s contract with the city of St. Louis prohibited it. Kroenke didn’t like that.
  6. Kroenke learned that cities will throw money at an NFL franchise to entice the owners to move to their city.
  7. Kroenke plans to build an NFL palace in Inglewood, California. Not a Rams palace, an NFL palace.
  8. Support for the Rams in Los Angeles faded quickly after an initial surge at the start of the 2016 season.
  9. Support for Los Angeles NFL home teams was weak throughout the late 1980s and 1990s.

Here’s my prediction: Stan Kroenke will build the NFL palace in Los Angeles, then move the Rams to London. The stadium in LA will become the permanent home of the Super Bowl, plus the site of marquee match-ups throughout the season. Los Angeles will be happy because they’ll get to see more of their favorite teams in these marquee games, the NFL will have a destination-city address, and Stan will sell the Rams to London investor after getting a sweet deal to move the team to the UK.

This was Stan’s long con. He’ll get a lot of help from other owners to build the LA complex. He’ll get the NFL to sign a contract for use of the facilities that will cover his investment. It’s what he does, and he’s better at it than anyone else in the NFL. Then he’ll get a similar deal in London, move the team, and dump it. He’ll hold onto the properties and adjacent properties. He’ll clean up.

This is pure speculation, but Kroenke could make more money my way than by keeping the Rams in LA.

I’m not sure when this will play out, but it will be after the new stadium opens and before the Rams become a contender. (Okay, just about everything will happen before the Rams become a contender.)

When you see news stories about Stan Kroenke buying land in the UK, get ready. Until then, you can tell people this scenario is your idea and you’ll look like a genius when it unfolds. And if it doesn’t, no one will remember a thing. That’s the great thing about predictions like this one: there’s no way to lose and several ways to win.

Oh, and there’s this from The Guardian:

Even before they have played their first game in LA, the Rams are seizing opportunities to spread themselves around the world. Because they are playing in a temporary stadium – the Los Angeles Coliseum – until their new home opens in 2019, they are subject to an NFL rule requiring them to play an overseas game in each of the next three seasons. While some teams might balk at giving up home games in three straight seasons, the Rams embraced the mandate, agreeing to honor an already-scheduled game in London this fall and to play a 2018 regular season game in China.

“This is philosophical, I think. There are people who will view change as a challenge and there are people who view change as an opportunity,” said Mark Waller, the NFL’s executive vice president of international. “In the Rams point of view this is an opportunity. This is a chance to re-frame how they view their franchise for the future.”

Expect that re-frame to end when the Rams move across the Atlantic.

You Don’t Hear “Big Data” Much Anymore, And For That I’m Thankful

Reading Time: 4 minutes

This is about Big Data.

You really can’t over-estimate what suckers business people are.

I’m not talking about people who create things or improve things. Guys like Steve Jobs and Donald Trump built great businesses. But they weren’t business people. They were builders. Running a business was a necessary evil that allowed them the freedom to build what they wanted to build. They were great businessmen because they cared about the work their companies did. Just like every small business owner who has the courage to strike out and build a business.

Most business executives, though, are not builders. They’re managers. They don’t really care what their companies do or how their products improve (or hurt) people’s lives. They care about quarterly reports and resource utilization targets. Put another way, Jobs and Trump saw the numbers as the result of their great work; managers see the work as a necessary evil to achieve the numbers.

Big Data was a buzzword for about six years. At first, it was a way for Silicon Valley types to get funding for their startups. Then, it was a way for corporate IT geeks to get funding for internal projects. IT sold Big Data as a way for their companies to “differentiate.”  Then it became a corporate strategic initiative at every company in America when IT convinced managers that “we are the ONLY company that DOESN’T have a Big Data strategy.”

Then Big Data predicted Hillary Clinton’s landslide win with 98% confidence. And Big Data went the way of the Iomega Zip Drive. (I know of very senior executive at a very large beverage company who, in 1996, shifted his entire portfolio, 100%, to Iomega stock.)

In 2012, I attended an innovation symposium. One topic was Big Data. The speaker breathlessly warned that “Big Data Is Coming!” like the Red Coats. As if Big Data were a thing. (In case you’re wondering, “Big Data” means “lots of data” usually about people and their behavior.) He said “Big Data” at least 100 times in a 25-minute presentation. Since I’m a former geek, a lot of people asked me afterwards, “That was such a great talk, but did you understand what we should do about it?” I wasn’t sure. Neither was the speaker. Except “invest” in it. Or invest to stop it. I can’t remember which.

Paul Revere raced through Massachusetts warning that the British were coming, just as our speaker warned “Big Data is coming!” But the people Revere warned had been prepped on what to do when the news came. Warnings about Big Data were useless because most people had no prior arrangements for dealing with the news.

Except for IT.

Corporate IT folks are masters at creating urgent needs for funding. They invented the Y2K bug. (I profited handsomely from that panic from 1997 to 1999.) No one knew exactly what the Y2K bug was, but gullible managers forked over billions and billions of dollars to fix it.

The Big Data invasion was another Y2K bug, only more mysterious. So it needed even more funding. When the election was called for Trump around 2:00 a.m. on November 9, it was like midnight January 1, 2000, all over again. The great IT emergency was dead.

Now, the IT folks have a new emergency that requires billions and billions of funding. IT professionals are A/B testing whether to call it AI (artificial intelligence) or “machine learning.” Both AI and machine learning are real things, but they’ve become buzzwords to seduce money from gullible business executives. That means IT folks are busy finding out what their executives’ greatest fears are, then creating pitch decks that “prove” AI/machine learning is exactly the thing to kill that bogeyman. (I’m watching this A/B testing happen, and it’s amazing to see. When the business execs reject AI for one reason or another, IT simply does a search and replace of “AI” with “machine learning,” pitches the exact same deck a month later, and gets the funding. You can’t make this up.)

What the executives don’t know is that AI and machine learning are both overhyped exaggerations, just like Iomega, Y2K, and Big Data. Says Andrew Orlowski of the Register (via ZeroHedge):

As with the most cynical (or deranged) internet hypesters, the current “AI” hype has a grain of truth underpinning it. Today neural nets can process more data, faster. Researchers no longer habitually tweak their models. Speech recognition is a good example: it has been quietly improving for three decades. But the gains nowhere match the hype: they’re specialised and very limited in use. So not entirely useless, just vastly overhyped. As such, it more closely resembles “IoT”, where boring things happen quietly for years, rather than “Digital Transformation”, which means nothing at all.

The more honest researchers acknowledge as much to me, at least off the record.

The bad news for most people: AI/machine learning will cost a lot of non-techies their jobs over the next few years. IT leaders have gotten really good at bilking gullible managers out of money for buzzwords like Y2K and Big Data. And business people ain’t getting any smarter. The AI bubble will burst after some catastrophe caused by a crappy algorithm—a catastrophe that a hydrocephalic 4-year-old could have anticipated and averted. By then, IT will have a new bogeyman.

But until then, I say do a shot every time you hear “AI” or “machine learning.” That’s what buzzwords are for.

We Tore It Apart—We Can Rebuild It

Reading Time: 4 minutes

How will history remember the Tea Party movement of 2009 to 2016? The answer to that question depends on what we do next.

The Tea Party movement was an antagonistic movement. We opposed bad stuff. We sought punishment for bad actors. We saw that the experts were wrong, and we pointed out their folly. Like William F. Buckley’s charter for National Review, we stood athwart history, yelling “STOP!” At its heart, the Tea Party movement opposed a corrupt and insulated establishment class.

With Donald Trump’s election, history yielded to our call. Now what?

From the Tea Party’s earliest days, we have struggled with this moment of antagonistic victory. I remember Lee Presser asking me at lunch one day in 2009, “to what end?” He encouraged me to paint a sensory vision of what life would be like should the Tea Party prevail.

That’s a bigger challenge than it might seem, at least for me it was. And still is.

I tried. But my efforts at developing a vision were often interrupted by the need for more antagonistic response to events. Despite these distractions, a few of us managed to try on a new, protagonist role. We launched a BUYcott in Ferguson following the first riots. We promoted municipal court reform. Some of us backed Eric Greitens for governor.

Above these concrete acts stood an abstract idea that you can see if you look hard enough: being against bad stuff is important, but it doesn’t make things better. To make life better for real people, we tried to apply principles from the right to problems the right mostly ignores. We began looking for ways to help those people who so need help, those who get too much of the wrong kind of help from the political party they support.

In 2015, this blog wrote quite a bit about Arthur C. Brooks’s book The Conservative Heart.

What inspired these posts was seeing the Tea Party heading toward success, which also meant the Tea Party was heading for the history books, like the Mothers’ March of Dimes Against Polio. Once polio was eradicated, the March of Dimes needed a new mission. The Mothers’ March of Dimes took on birth defects. What would be our new mission?

We’ve torn apart the establishment. Okay, maybe we’ve only weakened it. But it’s time now to become the protagonists of our story. It’s time to rise up from opposition. It’s our duty to rebuild the order we helped destroy.

I realize that working for something good is less gratifying to many people than fighting against something bad. Some will ignore our new mission and continue to fight the bad stuff. They might even fight us, just as a few Tea Partiers fought against Trump and Greitens and against those who supported them.

That’s okay. But some of us are builders. We want to leave concrete gifts to the future, not just burned-out buildings. We can look to Samuel Adams for guidance.Via Wikipedia:

While Adams tried to reassert control of the meeting, people poured out of the Old South Meeting House and headed to Boston Harbor. That evening, a group of 30 to 130 men boarded the three vessels, some of them thinly disguised as Mohawk Indians, and dumped all 342 chests of tea into the water over the course of three hours.[143] Adams never revealed whether he went to the wharf to witness the destruction of the tea.[144] Whether or not he helped plan the event is unknown, but Adams immediately worked to publicize and defend it.[145] He argued that the Tea Party was not the act of a lawless mob, but was instead a principled protest and the only remaining option that the people had to defend their constitutional rights.[146]

So what did Adams do after the Revolution?

Adams focused his political agenda on promoting virtue, which he considered essential in a republican government. If republican leaders lacked virtue, he believed, liberty was endangered. His major opponent in this campaign was his former protégé John Hancock; the two men had a falling out in the Continental Congress. Adams disapproved of what he viewed as Hancock’s vanity and extravagance, which Adams believed were inappropriate in a republican leader. 

Adams’s promotion of public virtue took several forms. He played a major role in getting Boston to provide a free public education for children, even for girls, which was controversial.[184]Adams was one of the charter members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1780.[185] After the Revolutionary War, Adams joined others, including Thomas Jefferson, in denouncing the Society of the Cincinnati, an organization of former army officers. Adams worried that the Society was “a stride towards an hereditary military nobility”, and thus a threat to republicanism.[186]

While Adams continued to opposed bad things, he focused on promoting good things: frugality, virtue, and republicanism. After initial opposition to the new Constitution, he supported the document in the Massachusetts ratification convention. Once the Bill of Rights was added, he became a strong proponent of the new federal government.

And his view of armed rebellion changed, too. According to Wikipedia:

Postwar economic troubles in western Massachusetts led to an uprising known as Shays’s Rebellion, which began in 1786. Small farmers, angered by high taxes and debts, armed themselves and shut down debtor courts in two counties. Governor James Bowdoin sent four thousand militiamen to put down the uprising, an action supported by Adams.[190]His old political ally James Warren thought that Adams had forsaken his principles, but Adams saw no contradiction. He approved of rebellion against an unrepresentative government, as had happened during the American Revolution, but he opposed taking up arms against a republican government, where problems should be remedied through elections. He thought that the leaders of Shays’s Rebellion should be hanged, reportedly saying that “the man who dares to rebel against the laws of a republic ought to suffer death”.[191]

Samuel Adams was a worthy role model for our days of rebellion during the Tea Party era. His post-Revolutionary example serves us well as we move to rebuilding faith in American institutions. No one owns the Tea Party, so you are free to continue dumping tea into Boston Harbor. I am moving on toward making America great again.

More to come. Stay tuned.

Confirmed: Coup Attempt Is Under Way In America

Reading Time: 2 minutes

You might have thought I was paranoid for wondering if some people in the CIA and the Deep State are plotting a coup to overturn our recent election.

The Wall Street Journal seems to agree with my conclusion: a coup attempt is going on in America. Rogue actors within the CIA, all of the major leftist media (New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, NBC, ABC, CBS), and probably major defense contractors seem to be involved, though the Wall Street Journal stops short of accusing advertisers. That’s understandable.

You’re probably thinking about the word “coup” yourself a lot. You’ll probably hear “coup” on the news in the coming days. And you’ll hear about more threats to Electors who plan to vote for Donald Trump on December 19. You will want to remember these words from the Wall Street Journal’s editors:

Only a few weeks ago Hillary Clinton’s campaign was denouncing Donald Trump as un-American for saying the election might be “rigged.” We criticized Mr. Trump at the time. But now that Mrs. Clinton has lost, her campaign is claiming the election really was rigged, albeit for Mr. Trump by Russian meddling, and it wants the Electoral College to stage what amounts to a coup.

That’s the only way to interpret the extraordinary statement Monday by Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta endorsing a special intelligence briefing for electors a week before they cast their ballots for President on Dec. 19. He released the statement hours after 10 members of the Electoral College sent a letter to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper seeking information on foreign interference in the election to judge if Mr. Trump “is fit to serve.” One of those electors is House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s daughter.

Remember, I was way in front of the WSJ on this coup business. First, Is the CIA Plotting a Coup? UPDATE FBI Disputes CIA Allegation – VIDEOS.

Then, yesterday, I pondered Why Trump Might Never Become President.

I admit that my posts sounded a little paranoid. But it turns out I’m not alone. The staid Wall Street Journal now uses the “coup” word to describe what’s going on in this country. Here’s more from Wall Street Journal:

What should really distress Americans is that the losers are trying to overturn the election results based on little more than anonymous leaks and innuendo. Whatever Russia’s hacking motives, there is no evidence that the emails it turned up were decisive to the election result. Mr. Podesta is citing a CIA judgment that Americans have never seen and whose findings are vaguely public only because one or more unidentified officials chose to relate them to a few reporters last week.

If you find yourself feeling scared or angry, you know why now. This is a serious coup attempt by the left wing and the Deep State to overturn a US election. Wars have been fought over less.

The Wall Street Journal concludes that the Democrats and the press probably know their Electoral College coup will fail. Maybe the left’s motive is only to make the Unites States ungovernable, to throw the country into violent chaos. Would that be any nobler a goal? Seeking chaos is a kind of evil, is it not?

What will those Democrats try next? Nothing lies beneath them.

Why Trump Might Never Become President

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Call me paranoid, but it seems Donald Trump’s chances of taking the oath of office for President are diminishing every day.

You might find yourself wondering why the CIA would plot a coup against Trump and his supporters. If you haven’t wondered about a CIA coup, you should. Focus your awareness for a moment on what Trump means to the people of the Deep State.

The Deep State involves those people and institutions that have insulated themselves from the consequences of elections. I’m not sure the CIA is actually part of the Deep State, but career intelligence people hang around with Deep State actors. Big banks, military systems producers, George Soros, and Warren Buffett are Deep State actors. So are Lockheed-Martin and Boeing. Rather than some wild theory, Deep State actors simply work to insulate themselves from risk. Political elections represent a risk to many, but not to them.

[For more on the Deep State vs. Donald Trump, see Breitbart.]

At least, not usually. Donald Trump’s election is different. Donald Trump and the people who support him threaten the Deep State. The only way I can think to explain the threat Trump represents to the Deep State is the ancient Roman gladiators.

Gladiators fought for their lives in circuses. Romans considered this entertainment. Like football. The game was a life-or-death struggle against other gladiators or against wild animals.

The Romans who attended these spectacles probably bet on the outcome of the matches. Some of these bets were huge, but the bettors had complete control of their own wagering. No matter what the gladiators did on the field, the betting games went on. (You can bet the mainstream media of the day reported on the bets, not the outcome of the deathmatches. The lives of the gladiators didn’t matter. Only the lives of the bettors.)

Think of the gladiators as Trump supporters. The big bettors at the Colosseum are Deep State actors. The bettors treated the gladiators like toys. Roman soldiers forced the gladiators into the pits. The Romans created a myth for slaves: being a gladiator was something to aspire to. Many slaves believed the myth and strove to become gladiators. To amuse the Romans. And toward the end of the Empire, the myths grew to attract free men and free women (yes, there were female gladiators) who signed contracts to fight. Gladiators even became sex symbols, reinforcing the myths.

Imagine how Rome’s Deep State would have reacted to a Roman who exposed the gladiatorial myth? What if a Roman spoke directly to the slaves and the free gladiators, in the language they understood, and told them, “you’re killing yourselves for no reason. You have a right to live your own life.” Imagine how swiftly and brutally the Caesar would  have smitten that blasphemer!

And what is Trump?

Trump is a guy who aroused the modern gladiators and slaves, working men and women who’ve lived as slaves and gladiators for the Deep State’s amusement. Intentionally or not, Trump has opened many eyes to the obvious fact that most Americans live a slave’s life: slave to the Deep State actors. We voted for Trump because we were sick of being slaves.

And the Deep State won’t stand for that. The Romans wouldn’t let their slaves abandon the gladiator fights. The Romans wouldn’t free slaves to pursue their own lives.

In a desperate and frightening show of shadowy force, the CIA, and big media have conjured up an excuse to deny Trump the White House. Their weapon is a fake news story, first in the Washington Post, then the New York Times, now . . . everywhere. The story, the narrative, goes like this: The CIA has proof that Russia manipulated the US election to put Trump into power.

It’s a complete lie, of course, but complete lies are more believable than little lies. And it seems to be working.

The manipulation of the Electoral College is going smoothly. Democrat electors are demanding an intel brief by the CIA. John McCain and Lindsay Graham (spelling intentional) have called for investigations. The White House is now saying, flat out, that Russia stole the election for Trump.

Right now, America’s slaves and gladiators are in a fight we didn’t expect. That means the Deep State got the drop on us. But there are more of us than there are of them. The Deep State has to ask itself this: are the slaves and gladiators a greater threat with or without Trump as their leader? (The Deep State has been attacking Michael Flynn for more than a year.)

With Trump in office, we have hope and patience. If the Deep State steals the election, we are free to do what must be done.

The Deep State has been exposed. It will unwind, one way or the other. The Trump way looks pretty safe and controlled. The other way looks like hell on earth.

P.S. Nothing in this post should be interpreted as a threat or as a call for violence. These are simply my observations of the situation and my expectation of reactions should various scenarios unfold. But you can’t say you weren’t warned.