Browse Month

September 2011

Would you do me a favor this Saturday?

Reading Time: 1 minutes

I try not to ask for much.  Okay, maybe that’s not true, but I’m going to ask you a favor, anyway. Mark this down:  7:00 pm, Saturday, October 1. 

It’s weird, I know.  But I’m asking for three presents in one.

First, my mom and dad celebrate their wedding anniversary this week. (62nd?)  Second, my wife and I celebrate our wedding anniversary this week.  Third, next week is my birthday.

I’d ask for a birthday party, but I know you’ll all be worn out from the big Forest Park event on Tuesday, October 4 at 5:00 pm.

So I’m going to ask you for a very simple favor.

Please watch KPLR Channel 11 at 7:00 pm this Saturday, October 1.  If you can’t watch, DVR it and watch later.

October 2011 Calendar – United States

See, I’ll be on. I’m the guest on a brand new news program hosted by Shirley Washington. Panelists include Charles Jaco and Betsey Bruce. (It could be lively!)

The format sounds great: a 15-minute regular news section followed by a 45-minute examination of one topic. So don’t stop watching if it’s straight news at the top of the hour.  Pop some popcorn, crack open a Bud Select, and relax.

Thanks to your work, the topic of the very first episode is the Tea Party Movement.

Since we couldn’t get all 7,000+ people registered in our database into the studio, they asked me to be your humble representative.  I hope I don’t let you down.

So please watch or DVR Saturday at 7, Channel 11.  And drop a nice note to Shirley Washington to thank her for making Tea Party the first topic.

Top 5 Moves for Herman Cain Supporters Right Now

Reading Time: 3 minutes

herman-cainHerman Cain is riding a wave of popularity because of his upset win in the Florida straw poll on Saturday.  He’s helped by Rick Perry’s free-fall and Mitt Romney’s establishmentarianism.  But Cain is a huge underdog.

That’s okay because America loves an underdog.

Here’s what must happen right now for Herman Cain to win:

1.  Social Media avalanche.  Get @THEHermanCain trending on Twitter, and keep it there for five consecutive days. How?  Simple. Use Hootsuite (or similar tool) to schedule original tweets about Herman Cain, with a shortened link to his site (http://bit.ly/r19euz) and his Twitter handle (@THEHermanCain).  Send 2 original tweets per day—one in the morning, one in the evening.  Post about Herman Cain, with link to his site (http://bit.ly/r19euz) on Facebook every other day (no more). (For more tips on effective social media campaigning, get my $1.99 ebook “Weaving the Roots.”)

2.  Bloggers posting human stories about why Florida voters picked Cain.  Real stories like this one from Byron York:

“I liked Cain, but I wasn’t sure he could win,” said Zena, from Washington County.  “But after I heard this, I thought it doesn’t matter if he wins or not — I am for this man. He was awesome.”

Or this one from the same York piece:

“I couldn’t make up my mind,” said Thelma, from Panama City, after the vote.  “It was the speech that made the hair stand up on my arms.  It wasn’t a tingle down my leg — it was an emotional excitement that this man knows how to get our country out of trouble.”

3.  Add a link to Herman Cain’s official website to your email signature. This is a powerful tool that everyone who sends emails can use.

4.  Attend a local event.  You’ll need to sign up for email blasts from the Cain campaign (http://bit.ly/r19euz) and read them. But don’t just read them. Forward important ones to 5 friends.  (Only important ones. Don’t spam the undecided.)

5.  Donate Money.  I know conservatives and independents hate the idea of money in politics. Without money, Cain cannot compete.  I’ll say it again:  without millions of small donations, Herman Cain will lose.  Of all five must-do actions on this list, this is the most important.  Give whatever you can, then tell the world, “I just donated to Herman Cain online http://bit.ly/r19euz.”

In 2008, the Republicans nominated John McCain—an echo.  In 1996, Republicans nominated Bob Dole—an echo.  In 1988, 2000, and 2004 Republicans nominated echoes. (Did I say “Republicans?”  I meant king-makers.)

If you want to make a difference—and blow Obama out of the water in November 2012—don’t give the American voter an echo—give him a choice.

While the Republican presidential field has many good men an women in its ranks, as do many Congressional and state races across the country, most candidates are corporate-sponsored echoes of big government and crony capitalism.

Our grassroots movement has come too far to return now to business as usual.

Last night, I had the rare and wonderful honor of introducing Phyllis Schlafly at a fundraiser for Ed Martin.  Mrs. Schlafly sits in the conservative pantheon with William F. Buckley, Ronald Reagan, Russell Kirk, and Barry Goldwater.  Her 1964 book, A Choice Not an Echo: The inside story of how American Presidents are chosen, laid the blueprint for Ronald Reagan’s near-miss in 1976 and victory in 1980.

In 2012, the GOP can give Americans a choice, or it can destroy itself with mere echoes.  At this moment in history, there is no third way.

 

Note: Views expressed are mine and do not reflect the official position of St. Louis Tea Party Coalition.

What Rick Perry Can Learn From Clark Griswold

Reading Time: 2 minutes

In 2001, I loaded my three boys, ages 13, 10, and 8 at the time, into the car and headed to downtown St. Louis. The Cubs were in town, and I planned to introduce my boys to the greatest rivalry in pro sports. We parked (for twenty dollars) and headed toward the stadium.

There was only one problem: we didn’t have any tickets. I planned to buy some on the street.

Scalpers were everywhere, but I underestimated the street value of tickets to this particular game. Four tickets together were hard to come by. I had over three hundred dollars in cash, but the few scalpers with sets of four demanded twice that. After forty minutes, I gave up.

clark-griswold-tree-240x300The boys didn’t complain as we listened to the first inning on the ride back to West County. They’d grown accustomed to dad’s ambitious plans falling apart. I’m pretty sure that when I wasn’t around, they called me “Clark Griswold.” And I know their friends did. (Thanks, Facebook.)

I’m reminded of this embarrassing episode every time I hear Rick Perry’s name.

I put high hopes on a Perry campaign earlier in the summer. I thought he was exactly what the country needed. He looks the part, he seemed great with the press, and he’s a former Democrat, just like Ronald Reagan. He seemed to have the right attitude, as well.

Rick Perry, though, is the Clark Griswold of presidential politics. Like my aborted baseballRickPerryDebateexcursion with the boys, Perry’s campaign strategy seems to have stopped with his announcement. His debate performances—all of them—have been dreadful.

This will sound uncharitable and condescending, but I know of no other way to say it: Rick Perry doesn’t seem to know very much.

He might be intelligent in IQ (I don’t honestly know), but he seems to lack the most basic information about important matters like Pakistani nukes and climate scientists. (Would it be too much to carry a card with “Dr. Roy Spencer” or “Roger Pielke Sr” written on it? Really?)

His defense of tuition credits for illegals irritates many, but at least he knows what the DREAM Act is.

It is Perry’s lack of stamina bothers me the most, though. He seems to punch himself out in the first round of these debates. He seemed to punch himself out in the first 72 hours of his campaign, too. I’m afraid that he’d collapse in exhaustion immediately after the GOP convention. Or, if elected, he’d end up in a sanitarium on a Caribbean island recuperating for six months immediately following the inauguration. For such a rugged looking man, he seems fragile.

Take it from a father who lives every day with the guilt of having been less than a perfect parent: Rick Perry doesn’t want to take a job that he can’t handle. Not when the world seems to be crumbling and frightened eyes everywhere look toward Uncle Sam for guidance and strength and ideas and hope.

And if you don’t believe me, just ask Barack Obama.

Who will feed the hungry, clothe the naked, tend the sick, visit the imprisoned . . . ?

Reading Time: 4 minutes

The candidates blew the emotional turning point in Monday’s CNN/Tea Party debate. Blew it. Big.

Before we go into that, hear me out on the pressure on those candidates.

Lights, Camera, Panic

Imagine being on a stage. Searing white brightness reduces your range of vision to a few degrees of arc. You hear hundreds of people making the sounds that audiences make, but you can’t really see them.

Before you are journalists bent on catching in a gaffe, or unprepared, or vulnerable. On either side of you stand your ideological soul mates. They, too, stand ready to skewer you with your own words.

I only marvel that people can even speak in that circumstance.  So what you’re about read does mean I could do better.  I couldn’t.

Still, when you take the stage, you better be ready.  And Dr. Paul and his colleagues were not.

Let Him Die?

The turning point in that debate involved Dr. Paul. He had the opportunity to champion his greatest cause—liberty.  He missed it.  The rest of the Republicans missed it, too.

Clarence Page recounts the moment in today’s Chicago Tribune:

Moderator Wolf Blitzerasked Paul, a medical doctor and fierce libertarian, if a seriously ill young man who had decided on his own to forgo health insurance suddenly needs expensive hospital care, should the state pay for it?

Paul, shaking his head, lectured, “That’s what freedom is all about. Taking your own risks. This whole idea that you have to take care of everybody. … ”

At that point Paul was interrupted by a burst of applause from the tea party-filled audience.

“But congressman,” Blitzer persisted, “are you saying society should just let him die?”

“Yeah,” shouted at least two voices in the crowd. But Paul, to his credit, said, “No.”

So who pays? Paul asserted that in his experience, friends, neighbors, churches and charities step forward to help.

Society vs. Government

Here’s how the scenario might have played out.

In answer to Blitzer’s second challenge, “are you saying society should just let him die?” Paul might have made a crucial distinction.

“Society, Mr. Blitzer, is not government; government is not society. Throughout the vast majority of human history, in fact, society was the unwilling slave to its unwanted government.  The history of man is a history of cruel domination.

“Two hundred thirty years ago, something changed.  On this continent, away from their masters, society woke up and said, ‘my only master is God.’  That society broke the chains that bound it to its European masters and formed its own government—a government subservient to the people.

Who Pays?

“Now you ask, ‘who pays for the sick who cannot pay for themselves.’ Well, we do. But not through some massive bureaucracy as far from Santa Monica as Philadelphia is from London. Instead, we, the people who surround our sick brothers, take care of him. This isn’t a Pollyanna dream; it’s the only way a free people can exist.

“Can we just abolish all of the systems and services that Washington has forced upon us over the decades?  No.  The good society that once occupied this land is a shell of its former self.  Most of us have lost the capacity to completely care for ourselves, much less caring for others.

“Corporate officers who believe their only job is to amass and hold ridiculous wealth, corrupt union bosses who exploit the hall to build their mansions, and ordinary citizens who turn a blind eye to the decay and want all around them—these are all the products of a government that over-reached its purpose.  Excessive government pacified us into the callous, hollow people many have become.

No Off Switch

“No, Wolf, we can’t just flip the switch on the federal programs that sweet-talked Americans out of their humanity. We need to wind them down as we, the people, restore the dignity, honor, and nobility we once carried.

“No, we’ll never reach every person—there will always be pathological money whores who exploit society. Like everyone else—everyone except the exploiters—I want government there to stop them.

“But I don’t want government to be the charity ward.  If you proxy out your decency, your proxy, not you, enters the Pearly Gates.

“Finally, no, our society should not stand around and watch a man die. But now it does. We expect somebody to do something about this. We wash our hands and say, ‘it’s government’s job.’   We seem to to have forgotten that, on this continent, the government is me.”

The After Party

The purpose of The After Party is to live that answer.  We must mend the tattered fabric of American society. We must learn how to offer our services and accept others’ hand.  Relying on government aid dispensed by a paid bureaucrat is demeaning.  Accepting the loving help of a stranger is the essence of humanity.

Twelve months from now, for thousands of participants in The After Party, government programs will become a superfluous waste of time, money, and energy.  We will be a force for good that no government can challenge.

Join Us 

If you want to mend the torn fabric of society as we ease out from under a bloated bureacracy, then fill out this simple form.  You will not receive our other, regular Tea Party news.  You will be in a special list of those who want to be prepared for that day when Washington can no longer pretend to be our consciences.

It’s All Your Fault

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Straight up:  We can’t tell you now where future After Parties will be.  We can’t name the venue.  And it’s all your fault!

Well, not all.  some if it’s my fault, but in a very innocent way.

Planning The After Party

Eisenhower said that planning is essential, but plans are useless.  He was right.

When we were planning The After Party, we figured about 50, maybe 75,  people would attend at each one.  We based this on a few factors, including some surveying of interest and attendance as last year’s Thursday Night Throwdowns.

We were wrong, if by “We” you mean “Bill.”

Yes, I was wrong.  Others warned, but I didn’t listen.

I’m happy to say I screwed up, though.

What Happened?

Well, over 100 people showed up.  And more will show up on October 20.  And more after that.

So our plan of rotating through great St. Louis restaurants is all shot to hell. Most restaurants can’t accommodate groups our size.

Plus, we can’t afford to rent a hall big enough for all of us, unless some angel comes through with an After Party grant to help us continue our mission (hint).

So Michelle Moore and others are busily at work trying to find a solution.  We’ll need space for more than 100 in October and November, and more than that in future months.

If you can help with a donation, please click below.  If you can help with venues, please send an email to admin@stlouisteaparty.com using the subject line: After Party Venues. (You must use After Party Venues in the subject line, or it won’t get to the people who need it.)

Bottom Line

You overwhelmed the system, you Cloward-Piven wannabes,  with your desire to fix America.  You are champions.  You are heroes.  Society owes you a big thank you.  On behalf of that grateful nation, let me be the first to say Thank You for accepting the challenge of a generation.  Again.

 

DONATE

 

 

Better Yet

Become a Sustaining Member.

Membership Levels