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How To Ruin a Perfectly Good Joke
Reading Time: 2 minutes

If you talk long enough, you can butcher the best joke in the world–even the one from Monty Python that the Allies used to win WWII.

Tuesday night at a Tea Party meeting, I managed to destroy a joke of my own, poor making, and insult a friend at the same time. That takes talent. Or . . . something.

So, first, let me apologize to Adam Sharp, the best indy video journalist alive, since he was the victim of my horrible comedic delivery. Also, I apologize to the 30 people I confused with the joke.

Now, for how to ruin a joke: talk.

Here’s the joke I intended: Adam Sharp committed the ultimate sin of journalism ethics–he asked a Democrat Congressman about the Constitution.

Or

Thanks to Adam Sharp, we now know it’s unethical for a journalist to ask a Democrat about the Constitution.

Okay. Not fall on the floor, but you get it, right?

But that’s not the joke I told. Instead, I rambled on for a minute in set-up. I built it up for an ending that no punchline could deliver. And then I fumbled the punchline.

In 2010, Adam Sharp asked Phil Hare how he could square Obamacare with the US Constitution. Rep. Hare answered,  “I don’t worry about the Constitution.”

WHAMO!  Hare’s done as a member of Congress. The video went viral. It was a turning point (one of many) in the 2010 election.

But the drive-by media wanted to claim Sharp’s question was inappropriate, that he edited out key parts, etc. The usual nonsense. As you saw, Adam provided more context than was probably necessary.

I knew the audience was familiar with story, so I tried a little sarcastic humor. I still think it would have been funny if someone more capable had delivered it.

Sorry, Adam. I think you rock. And my delivery sucks.

H/T to Van Harvey for calling me out on this.

Don’t believe my joke bombed sucked? See for yourself:

Face palm. Cringe. Gag. Vomit.

  • Welcome to the club Bill. The dumbest things come out of my mouth when I try to be clever. That aside, the meeting was just what we needed. The only thing I would add is the need to stay focused. Many a good cause is cast aside when good people become distracted.

  • Jonah

    In regard to the purpose of the meeting, this article should be of interest to you.

    How municipalities in St. Louis County, Mo., profit from poverty

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/wp/2014/09/03/how-st-louis-county-missouri-profits-from-poverty/

    • Steve

      When is the recap of the meeting coming? Could not make the meeting but interested. Sympathize with the situation in the article posted, but poverty or situation in life does should not get you special treatment in laws or making arraignments with the court. Lately tha is a position or tone I am seeing out of recent events… The rules are for everyone else… I get special rules or treatment because… Fill in the blank.

      • Coming soon. Life sit not the point. Muni courts should obey the law. They often don’t.

  • I çan see it now, and am thrilled to have been mistaken. My apologies Bill, and to Sharp.

    • No apologies needed from you. Good God, that’s brutal.

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