Many Times Trump’s Crazy Statements Turned Out to Be Right

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Almost every time Donald Trump says something crazy, something so outlandish and wrong, he later turns out to be right.

I know his critics can’t read my blog. (Literally, they can’t. They have a psychological problem that prevents their brains from processing information that’s inconsistent with their beliefs.) But for those of you who want to be right with the truth instead of just right with your own opinion, this will be a great post to forward to your friends. I’ll make it easy with clickable Twitter boxes like this one.

I googled “Trump was right.” I got a lot of links back. I was embarrassed to realize I had forgotten most of these cases. Maybe you remember these now. Before you decide Trump’s crazy wiretap story is, well, crazy, you will want to recall all the other times Trump’s crazy assertions were true.

  • Recently, Trump talked about all the migrant-caused violence in Sweden. The media and Swedish politicians said he was crazy. But he turned out to be right. In fact, we’ve since learned that Swedish politicians routinely cover up rape, murder, and mayhem that’s perpetrated by migrants. So Trump probably knew from intelligence reports that there was more crime in Sweden than Sweden admits. But Trump was right about terrorism in Sweden.
  • Trump calls CNN and New York Times and Washington Post “fake news.” The pundits roar. But courts and journalism watchdogs agree with Trump. As The Black Sphere pointed out, a court recently fined CNN for pushing fake news that hurt someone. Washington Post claimed Russia had hacked our electric grid, which was a total lie. And New York Times published a story that the government wiretapped Trump’s aides, then another story that the government didn’t wiretap Trump’s aides. Trump was right about CNN and others being fake news.
  • When Trump said it was too early to tell who was behind a string of threats against Jewish centers, the Anti-Defamation League, and others attacked Trump, some accusing Trump supporters of the threats. But the arrest of far-left St. Louis journalist Juan Thompson, a Bernie supporter, proved Trump was right to withhold judgment until all the facts were in.
  • Trump said the Yemen raid by Navy SEALs was a success. John McCain and the media said it was a failure. Then we blew up a bunch of terrorists in Yemen using intel gained in that raid. Trump was right about Yemen.
  • General Motors flatly denied Trump’s allegation that GM was moving Chevy Cruze production to Mexico. The media jumped in on GM’s side. But on January 19, CNN Money admitted Trump was right. GM was laying off 1,200 Americans because of its move to Mexico. GM lied, Trump was right.
  • Remember when Trump said he would save thos Carrier jobs in Indiana? Everyone said he was nuts. He saved most of them, didn’t he?
  • Trump called himself a conservative person. Professional conservatives howled and called him a charlatan. Yet, so far, Trump has been the most conservative president since Calvin Coolidge. (Sorry, Mr. Reagan.) And he’s just getting started!
  • Trump said he’d appoint a conservative to replace Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court. Pundits and professional conservatives said he’d pick a liberal. Cruz said he’d pick Merrick Garland. But Trump picked Neil Gorsuch, a favorite of Ted Cruz.
  • Last year, Buzzfeed found 7 crazy pop culture predictions Trump was right about. Turns out Trump is pretty good at predicting who will stay married and who will get divorced.
  • Trump was lambasted (still is) for saying a lot of drugs come into America from Mexico. But even HuffPo admits Trump was right.
  • The media and Mexican groups attacked Trump’s “crazy” assertion that 80 percent of young women crossing Mexico from Central America to reach the US were raped along the way. Turns out Trump was right and the Mexican activists were wrong.
  • Nobody believed Trump when he said he could win the Republican nomination as late as April 2016. I was in DC in April hanging out with political friends. They all expected the GOP to find some way to dump Trump and appoint Cruz or Rubio as the nominee. Trump wrapped up the nomination less than a month later.
  • None of the major media, major pollsters (save for Rasmussen), political pundits, or Hollywood celebs gave Trump a snowball’s chance in hell at winning on November 8. But Trump divested all of his stock holdings in June of 2016 because “I felt very much that we’d be winning.” As the Dallas News put it: “Trump was right, we were wrong.” Showtime calls the election the biggest political upset of all time. And until November 9th, so many people called Trump’s confidence a sign of craziness.

(Read how Trump completed the Tea Party)

Look, there are probably another 100 cases where Trump said or tweeted something “crazy” that turned out to be right. You’re probably thinking of several that I missed. But I’m tired of writing. Almost every time Trump says something outlandish, he’s right and everyone else is wrong. I’m used to it. You might want to just start nodding your head at everything Trump says. He’s usually right. And always right about the important stuff.

Before you decide that Trump’s wiretap tweets were crazy, think about this list. And think about Scott Adams’s point: presidents have access to more information than anyone alive. It’s possible that Trump knows something about those wiretaps that you and the New York Times editorial board do not.

If history is any guide, expect to see this headline in a few days: “Trump Proven Right On Wiretaps.”

 



6 thoughts on “
Many Times Trump’s Crazy Statements Turned Out to Be Right

  1. Trump was not right about Sweden. I stay in Sweden. Many, many cities in the US have more problem with young angry men on the streets or drug dealers than the major cities in Sweden( Stockholm, Göteborg, Malmö). Have you ever heard about the War on Drugs in the US?

    For example. The total the number of persons in prison in Sweden it is 4200. And the number has not increased. Compare that with any state in the US with 10 million persons. The reason for the low number in Sweden is that violent crimes are less frequent in Sweden.

    • Many Swedes say Trump is right. And there’s evidence that the Swedish government covers up migrant crime. You should be careful next time you go there.

      On the other hand, yes, America is a violent country by comparison. But Sweden is the size of Michigan in population and Missouri in area. Just a tiny fraction of the US. Comparing the US to Sweden is like comparing a junior B hockey club to the Montreal Canadiens.

      • Yes the Swedish Police cover up things about what the know about a crime the first days after crime has been reported. All serious police organizations do like that, they try to do cover things in the beginning of an investigation because they do not want to inform the bad gays what the Police know about them. Later on when the case come to a court most of the information become public, for ex full name of the persons, their background, their address, their criminal record etc. Any journalist can get a copy. There is no cover up of migrant crime. In Sweden there is a law that say that any citizen can demand a copy and no questions asked why he want a copy. So your so called evidence above is nothing,

    • Since you mentioned Malmö:

      A total of 15,970 residents of the city left for neighbouring municipalities, most of them being families, Karpestam said. “We have a negative net migration to neighbouring municipalities. There are many families who choose to move. One might suspect that they move to homes because they want to have a garden,” he noted.

      Teachers have also been leaving in recent months due to the strain caused by mass migration. One in six teachers left the city between January and October of last year.

      The explosion of crime could have also influenced families leaving the city over the last few years. Already this year, police have vowed to tackle the warring gangs in the city after a 16-year-old boy was gunned down in January.

      Read the rest here.

  2. Great story, Ken. Outstanding. Reminds me of several stories in Robert Greene’s The 33 Strategies of War. One story was about a samurai who approached each duel in dramatically different fashion. One time he’d show up hours late. The next time hours early. Once he use two weapons. Once he used a boat oar he whittled into a long spear. Each time, he learned what he could about his opponent and exploited that opponent’s greatest weakness.

    Bobby Fischer’s also mentioned. He, too, showed up late and frustrated his Russian opponent.

    The name of the strategy in which these stories are told is Never Fight the Last War. When Trump’s EO banned immigration from 7 countries, some people (wrongly) asked “why ban people from countries that never sent terrorists?” When I explained that they were violating the strategy of never fighting the last war, these people were truly perplexed. They had no idea what I meant.

    These are not stupid people, but I think few people are capable of strategic thinking. They can’t imagine anything that is beyond their own experience. I’m not even talking about black swans. It’s worse than that. Most people can’t imagine the weather changing in a matter of an hour for instance.

    You would probably like Nassim Taleb’s Antifragile if you haven’t read it. It’s at least as mind-altering as The Fourth Turning was to me. I’ll blog about it more when I’m done. I read very fast, but some books deserve to be savored and considered. Antifragile is one.

  3. Rashid Nezhmetdinov was a cold war Soviet chess master. Although he never rose above Master he would annihilate opponents, former world champions included.
    Most Soviet chess players were well versed in chess theory, Nezhmetdinov was not. He was a hungry player who thought on his feet.
    One notable game he was in losing position. Conventional players would have resigned. Rashid did not, he sacrificed his queen, and rewrote Soviet chess.
    If Washington Politicians played chess, they would see the risk of competing with an outsider. One who uses the rules differently than they do.

    Rashid Gibiatovich Nezhmetdinov vs Oleg L Chernikov (1962) “Nezly Done!” http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1260278

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