I’m 100% with Governor Greitens

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Nothing has shaken my support for Eric Greitens.

People ask me if I’m sorry I supported him. Are you kidding?

Governor Greitens signed Right to Work. Something I’ve supported since it first appeared in the 1970s.

Governor Greitens strengthened Missouri’s strong Right to Life policies.

Governor Greitens is rebuilding Missouri jobs and wages.

Governor Greitens is doing exactly what we elected him to do for Missouri.

Is he perfect? Of course not. Neither am I. I have flaws in places most people don’t have places.

I won’t write about speculations. What is known and admitted is only enough to confirm that Governor Greitens is a mere mortal. Like me. But far more accomplished.

I proudly wear my Day One shirt when I do dead lifts. It’s the greatest testimony I can give. Because dead lifts are what prepare us for action. And I supported Greitens for action.

He’s giving us action. He’s making Missouri great again.

I stand behind my Governor. And I’m proud to say it.

How to spot a #StableGenius

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You probably would like to know how to spot a very stable genius. It’s a skill that can come in handy. (Free Bonus: I’ll point you to the funniest thing I ever read in my life. Just because I like you. But first . . .)

Well, today, Donald J. Trump gave us a lesson in genius detection.

With the MSM chanting “mentally unfit” and “stupid,” our very stable genius president took to his favorite persuasion tool, Twitter. Here is his genius 3-part tweet:

Dilbert creator and persuasion expert Scott Adams used his Coffee with Scott Periscope this morning to explain the genius of Trump’s technique:

As Scott predicted, the Trump-hater took the president’s genius bait.

To sum up, you can spot a genius by the way they trigger their enemies’ sarcasm and sanctimony to spread the idea they want spread. Donald Trump got CNN and Clay Aiken (and millions of other unhinged leftists) to repeat “very stable genius Trump” tens of millions of time in just a few hours. CNN might even launch a TV show called “Stable Genius” that discusses nothing but Trump. That’s genius.

And it brings us to The Gorilla Channel.

A comedian wrote a spoof of Fire and Fury. It’s so funny I hurt myself laughing and almost dialed 9-1-1 because I was having trouble breathing. I was laughing that hard. You will, too. Be careful where you are when you read this in a moment.

But the funniest thing: most leftists and Trump-haters thought this was an actual passage from the book! They retweeted like madmen and shared it with their friends. Only to find out . . . it was a spoof! In fact, the author had to change his Twitter handle to “the gorilla channel thing is a joke.” Cognitive dissonance at its best!

Read this genius spoof of the Wolff’s mostly-fake book that caused so much concern:

Now you know how to spot a genius.

Looking ahead to season four of Trump: The President

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Scott Adams first identified Donald Trump’s greatest strength. What do you think that might be?

It’s not his money or his business experience. Those are strengths, sure, but they’re not THE strength.

Scott Adams believes Trump’s campaign was a movie script. Here’s what Adams wrote way, way back when Trump’s candidacy was still just a PR stunt because he had zero chance of winning even a single primary:

A movie script is almost always arranged in what the professionals call a three-act form. In this model, the protagonist always has some sort of life-changing event (such as suddenly becoming the frontrunner for president) in act one.

In act two, we see the protagonist living out the results of that change. In the Trump movie, we see a smiling candidate amassing popularity and defying the experts. Just like act two in any good movie. This is the calm before the storm.

At the end of the second act, nearly all movies follow the model where some unsolvable problem rears its head. The audience must feel that the protagonist can’t escape this problem. We know the movie is fiction, but we still feel the emotions of the actors. We love the feeling of the third act because it reminds us of our own unsolvable problems. The main difference is that the movie hero finds a way to solve the unsolvable. That solution is what makes it a movie. The audience needs to feel the third act tension followed by an unexpected solution in order to get the chemical rush of movie enjoyment.

If you follow Scott Adams, you already know that Trump intentionally sets traps for himself. He creates “unsolvable problems” that everyone knows will be his downfall. From his immigration statements to his war with Megyn Kelly to jailing women who have illegal abortions to pussygate, Trump turns every small win into a future disaster with the things he says.

And, yet, here we are. Donald J. Trump is the 45th President of the United States. Nothing can change that. Trump is president, and Israel is about to name the new Western Wall train station after him.

So I buy some of Scott Adams’s story. Trump does provide viewers a great action-adventure storyline. Every win sows the seeds for the next unsolvable problem. People feel compelled to tune in to the next episode to see how The Donald escapes this mess. Like the old Batman series. Or Silicon Valley. Or . . . here’s where I think Scott Adams is wrong.

Movies usually resolve themselves pretty neatly. Except for Star Wars, which ended with Darth Vader escaping to set up his next attack on Luke, Han, and the Princess. But most movies don’t explicitly sow the seeds of future problems in the resolution of the current story. That’s more like television.

Great TV heroes need a nearly as-great villain. Or, in the case of Batman, many near-equal villains. Trump has many near-equal villains: Robert Mueller, James Comey, CNN, New York Times, Washington Post, etc. There’s also the really scary villains like Iran and Kim Jung Un. When those villains start to drift away, Trump has an uncanny knack for pulling them back in. Ratings depend on a series of insurmountable problems. We want to see how our hero escapes each one of them. And we demand that every plot line has its resolution.

The Villains

In other words, Donald Trump has turned world history into a television series. And we’re already at the end of season three.

Season One: The series begins as Trump descends the huge escalator in Trump Tower and declares his candidacy by saying Mexico isn’t sending us their best people, but their rapists and drug dealers. Pundits and experts write his candidacy off as a publicity stunt. But our hero seems to be serious. Trump defies conventional wisdom by eschewing a ground game and focusing on huge rallies with tens of thousands of people. And despite all of his supposed missteps and inflammatory rhetoric, Season One ends with Trump miles ahead of his closest competitor for the GOP nomination, but the entire conservative intelligentsia turns against Trump, setting an insurmountable problem for Season Two.

Season Two: Season Two of Trump begins with the run-up to the first Republican caucuses and primaries. At this point, Republicans are either fully behind Trump or fully against him. The leading conservative magazine devotes an entire issue to hating Trump. And Trump loses the first event to Ted Cruz in Iowa. But Trump rallies, sweeping a number of primaries leading up the decisive Super Tuesday blowout. He even holds a bizarre press conference that’s really an infomercial for many of the Trump businesses. It’s the strangest thing anyone has ever seen in American politics. At least in the TV era.

The first half of Season Two ends as Trump wins the nomination and continues his unconventional ways. He fires two campaign managers. He gives a blistering “America First” acceptance speech. He does everything wrong but Trump stills comes out on top.

In the climax to Season Two, Trump upsets the favored (by 98%) candidate to become the president-elect. His enemies, left and right, band together to form a Resistance movement. And the Russian Collusion narrative sets up our hero for the ultimate downfall in Season Three. Ask any anti-Trumper or NeverTrumper on December 29, 2016, and they’ll tell you Trump won’t survive the first 100 days in the Oval Office. Everyone expects the Deep State to take Trump down. Stay tuned for Season Three.

Season Three: Trump’s third season opens with a controversial inauguration. Trump disputes press estimates of the crowd size at his inauguration. Then Trump fires the FBI director, his attorney general recuses himself from the Russian investigation, and an underling appoints a sinister special counsel named Robert Mueller. Mueller is the smoking guy from X Files brought to life. Mueller is like The Penguin or Mr. Freeze. (Comey is The Riddler.) The anti-Trump press declares his presidency a failure after two attempts to overturn Obamacare fail in Congress.

But Trump looks amazingly deft at foreign policy. He wins favor with China’s leader. Israel loves him. His support base grows more resilient. His opponents lose popular support when they turn to mass violence over the summer.

Season Three ends with our hero’s biggest win since the election. Trump drives home the largest tax reform since Reagan and biggest single tax cut in US history. But the Russian narrative continues unabated, setting up Season Four. Pundits and experts say Republicans will lose the House and Senate to Democrats in the upcoming off-year elections.

Season Four: Here are just some of the open plot lines going into season four:

  • Will Robert Mueller find evidence of Russian collusion?
  • Will the Justice Department’s inspector-general indict Robert Mueller, James Comey, Andy McCabe, Peter Strzock, or Bruce Ohr?
  • Will Trump’s wall get Congressional okay?
  • Will North Korea nuke San Francisco triggering World War III?
  • Will Iran go to war with Saudi Arabia triggering World War III?
  • Will Trump get his big, beautiful infrastructure bill through Congress?
  • Will Democrats take control of the House and Senate and immediately begin impeachment proceedings?
  • Or will Trump find a way to get out of these jams before Season Four ends?

We don’t know how season four of Trump: The President will unfold. But we have to watch it. It’s the greatest show on earth.

2018: The beginning of the end of the Fourth Turning in America

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Regardless of its ideology, that new leadership will assert public authority and demand private sacrifice. Where leaders had once been inclined to alleviate societal pressures, they will now aggravate them to command the nation’s attention.

—William Strauss and Neil Howe: The Fourth Turning: What the Cycles of History Tell Us About America’s Next Rendezvous with Destiny

Donald Trump can’t stand festering problems. Trump forces problems to the surface, into the daylight, where they can be fought and settled. So he can move on.

Trump seems less concerned with the outcome than with getting an outcome. A loss is better than a tie to our president.

And William Strauss and Neil Howe prophesied just such a leader in their 1997 book The Fourth Turning. You should read it. Again. Especially chapter 10: A Fourth Turning Prophecy.

Soon after the catalyst, a national election will produce a sweeping political realignment, as one faction or coalition capitalizes on a new public demand for decisive action.

The old Republican Party is dead. The new GOP is a populist-conservative coalition. Establishment Republicans cannot win without their populist wing, just as the GOP of the 1970s and 1980s could not win without its Evangelical Christian wing. We will never see that old establishment return in our lifetimes.

And The Fourth Turning saw all of this coming.

In foreign affairs, 2018 will see larger swaths of the American public, academia, and media turn against globalization and toward nationalism. They won’t call it “nationalism,” but the results will be nationalistic. Just as Strauss and Howe predicted:

In foreign affairs, America’s initial Fourth Turning instinct will be to look away from other countries and focus total energy on the domestic birth of a new order. Later, provoked by real or imagined outside provocations, the society will turn newly martial. America will become more isolationist than today in its unwillingness to coordinate its affairs with other countries but less isolationist in its insistence that vital national interests not be compromised.

The US economy, as we saw yesterday, will surge. Just as Strauss and Howe predicted:

The economy will in time recover from its early and vertiginous reversals. Late in the Crisis, with trust and hope and urgency growing fast, it may even achieve unprecedented levels of efficiency and production. But, by then, the economy will have changed fundamentally. Compared to today, it will be less globally dependent, with smaller cross-border trade and capital flows. . . .

The Fourth Turning even saw Trump’s massive infrastructure bill coming 21 years ahead of time:

Fourth Turning America will begin to lay out the next saeculum’s infrastructure grid— some higher-tech facsimile of turnpikes, railroads, or highways.

And a shift away from entitlements that benefit individuals over society, toward large projects that benefit society over the individual. I.e., the general welfare:

The economic role of government will shift toward far more spending on survival and future promises (defense, public works) and far less on amenities and past promises (elder care, debt service). The organization of both business and government will be simpler and more centralized, with fewer administrative layers, fewer job titles, and fewer types of goods and services transacted.

We are already seeing this prophecy play out. Globalism is officially in decline. Paul Ryan plans to reform entitlements in 2018. President Trump is promising a huge investment in defense and public works, paid for by growth and entitlement reform.

But these deep cultural changes will create intense conflict in the United States. The society shaped after World War II will be replaced by a new society. Just as Franklin Roosevelt laid the groundwork for the last American era, Donald J. Trump is laying the groundwork for the next.

And one generation will provide the grit and toughness to drive all this change. That generation is the least talked-about generation in history. It’s the generation of slackers. It’s the generation of dangerous children. It’s the generation that grew up with Donald J. Trump: Generation X. The change that’s coming is a direct result of America’s first Gen X Election.

Soon, but not now, we’ll take a deeper look at Generation X’s role in the next era of history.

2018 will change American culture at its core

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If you’re wondering how things will change in 2018, you might think back the mid-1980s.

In the 1980s, leftist professors, leftist news media, and leftist entertainers were angry. For years, they’d preached that Ronald Reagan was a neo-Nazi buffoon whose incompetence and malice would destroy America. Maybe even wipe out the human species. “I believe Ronald Reagan can turn America back into what it once was,” said comedian Steve Martin on Saturday Night Live in 1980, “a vast wasteland covered with ice.”

By 1986, though, the left’s dire predictions were ruined. Unemployment was low. Gasoline was under $1 a gallon in many places. The Iron Curtain showed signs of cracking. Stocks were soaring. Ronald Reagan was re-elected in one of the largest landslides ever. It was Morning in America.

So what did the left do? Did they grudgingly admit their errors? Did the credit Ronald Reagan for America’s miraculous turnaround?

Of course not. These are leftists we’re talking about. Admitting error takes character, a quality prohibited on the left.

Instead, the left found alternative heroes. The left created a narrative to explain America’s resurgence in which Reagan became the beneficiary of other people’s efforts.

Those other people: American workers.

In the left’s view, the American worker recognized Reagan’s wicked ineptness and took the country on its shoulders. Blue collar heroes sacrificed and scratched to remake America in spite of Reagan’s terrible, awful policies and blundering, dangerous style. Ted Turner made friends with the Soviet Union, conducting his own foreign policy to save the world.

This narrative preserved the left’s biases while explaining Morning in America. The left was wrong, but they didn’t mind. Their hallucinations, their self-images, were intact.

Look ahead to 2018, now. The US economy is poised to explode never before since Reagan. There’s a possibility of 7%+ GDP growth in at least one quarter of 2018. The Dow Jones Industrial Average could double by years end, approaching 50,000.

Will Democrats and the media credit Trump?

If you answered “yes” or hesitated in answering “no,” you don’t understand the leftist mind. The left will never admit Trump made America great again.

Instead, they’ll create an alternative explanation for surging American greatness. That explanation will be the same one they used in 1986: the American worker.

Here’s how 2018 will play out:

  1. President Trump will work with Democrats to hammer out an enormous infrastructure bill. Democrats will go along because they need votes in November. They’ll see the infrastructure bill as a way of driving a wedge between the president and the House Freedom Caucus while giving Democrat incumbents a bragging point in their districts.
  2. The tax reform bill will fuel a late-spring, early-summer rally like you’ve never seen before. Employers will complain about a huge, historic shortage of quality labor and about the rapidly rising wage problem. (Yes, wage growth will officially become a problem in May 2018, when Krugman declares “wages are out of control.”)
  3. The Justice Department will begin anti-trust investigations of Amazon, Google, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft as both conservatives and leftists attack Silicon Valley’s unchecked power and abuses.
  4. By late summer and early fall, economists will project 2018’s economy to one of the best on record.
  5. By early fall, the infrastructure bill passed early in 2018 will see a slew of new construction across the country. People will take note of all the cranes on America’s skyline. They’ll complain about highway construction as commutes and road trips grow longer.
  6. Just before the 2018 elections, the left will need a new narrative to explain American greatness. That new narrative: America’s workers.

What will this narrative look like?

Bon Jovi and Bruce Springsteen’s working-class music will return with a vengeance. But a new blue-collar music star will emerge. Movies and television shows worshipping blue collar workers will premiere. (Trump fan Rosanne returns in the fall.)

Economists will explain how labor turned America around despite Trump’s malicious ineptness. Specifically, how American consumers decided to stop paying down debt and start living a little after recovering from the post-financial crisis trauma. These economists will carefully explain that Trump’s policies of lower taxes, less regulation, and strong foreign policy, actually hindered economic growth.

Feminists will tell us that successful women can best express their feminity by choosing a blue-collar mate. (Seriously, this will happen.) Meanwhile, anti-Trump and NeverTrump pundits will warn that both America’s economic resurgence and its growing popular support for President Trump (above 50% by the end of summer) are “a mile wide and an inch deep.”

Of course, many things could derail all this. There’s North Korea and Iran. There’s Russia. There’s China. There’s Bob Mueller. But those are all low-probability risks. And even if one of those risks materializes, we can’t be sure whether it will help or hurt the scenario I’ve just laid out.

In the end, 2018 will be seen by most American voters as the year things turned around in America. Just like 1984. The change will be broad and deep, affecting education, entertainment, news, fashion, marriage rates (rising), birth rates (rising), and attitudes.

How much credit belongs to Trump will never be settled. But the truth will lie somewhere between the narratives offered by Trump’s strongest critics and his strongest supporters.

We are entering the second half of the Fourth Turning. Trump was as much a result of the cycles of history as a catalyst. But without his style and substance, the enormous social change sweeping America could not have happened.

Tomorrow, we’ll look deeper into that Fourth Turning prophecy. For now, think about how your life will change with growing wages, a retreat from technomania, and a revitalization of both American manufacturing and blue collar workers. You might like what you see.

4 Years Ago Today, I Predicted de Blasio Would Ruin New York City

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I’m scheduling this blog on December 26, 2013. I’m predicting Bill de Blasio will be as bad for New York City as Mayor John Lindsay (1967-1974).

Read the original blog here.

Now, let’s look back at the New York City de Blasio inherited. According to ZeroHedge blog:

 New York crime rates are at historic lows, the $72.7 billion budget is balanced, jobs are at an all-time high and a record 54 million tourists pumped money into the economy this year. Homicides have declined by almost 50 percent since Bloomberg became mayor in 2002, and this year’s total of 333 through Dec. 29 is 20 percent below last year’s record low.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Is crime in NYC better or worse than in 2013?
  2. Is the budget still balanced?
  3. How many tourists visited NYC compared to the 54 million in 2013?
  4. Were there more or fewer homicides than the 333 in 2013?
  5. Is NYC on the right track?

Write your comments below.