Category: Political Psychology

2016 Election, Political Psychology

Caution: Identifying as ‘NeverTrump’ Changes Your Brain

When a person declares himself “NeverTrump,” he thinks he’s making a political statement. Or a moral one. But he’s not. He’s making a psychological commitment that’s very difficult and painful to break. Identity is the highest, most powerful form of persuasion. Identity also drives our decisions in parts of the brain we don’t really have …

2016 Election, Political Psychology, Trump

How to Predict Trump’s Landslide Win

You might have noticed that my predictions have been remarkably accurate lately, have you not? For example, on Sunday, May 1, I predicted Ted Cruz would suspend his campaign after getting trounced in Indiana. Two days later, Cruz lost the Indiana primary to Donald Trump 53 to 36. At the time I wrote, many pundits and …

2016 Election, Political Psychology, Trump

Who Is Conservative?

People think they’re rational, but we’re not. For example, on many issues, Trump’s positions are almost identical to Ronald Reagan’s. When it comes to abortion, trade, taxes, foreign policy and the military, and entitlements like Social Security, you can’t fit a dime between Reagan and Trump. So why do people see Trump as far to the left …

2016 Election, Political Psychology, Trump

The Psychology of The Inevitable

I have no idea who will win the Indiana primary 72 hours from the time I write. But the people inside Ted Cruz’s campaign seem to have an idea. And it’s not good for them. Cruz’s top team expects their candidate to lose. And Senator Cruz seems to have accepted that outcome. Expectations Matter More …

Political Psychology, Trump

Fascinating Results from Leaders Eat Last Poll

This is the story of hard choices and how people resist making them. Last week’s poll asked you to watch a video by Simon Sinek before answering two, simple, two-part questions: which Republican candidate for President and Missouri Governor is most likely and least likely to eat last? I intended the poll to be hard. …

Economics and Economy, Political Psychology

Take a Walk on the Hedonic Treadmill

Here’s what happens when you raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour, according to scientists: Nothing. Well, not nothing. All kinds of bad things happen to the economy. But nothing happens for two groups of people central to the whole debate: workers who get a bump to $15 and employers who have to bump …

Political Psychology

5 Secrets Politicians Don’t Want You to Know

How long has it been since you said, “they just don’t listen to us?” By “they,” you mean politicians, of course. Maybe you feel they listen to lobbyists and big corporations and banksters, but they don’t listen to their constituents. I have to agree with you. Politicians don’t listen to their constituents. They don’t even …