Liberals Are Not the Enemy

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Forgive me. I say “liberal” sometimes when I mean something else.

My mistake is habit, not irony. (Irony would require some intent on my part.)

I grew up disparaging liberalism. I grew up reading and watching William F. Buckley Jr., for whom liberalism was the enemy.

In the post-WWII era, the liberalism of the day was a problem. But it was never the problem.

The problem in Western Civilization was a faction that used liberalism as cover. This faction crossed party lines. This faction actively sought and seeks the elimination of the US Constitution.

This dangerous faction included Republicans John Lindsay, George Romney, Lowell Weiker, and Nelson Rockefeller. Plus, many, many Democrats, communists, and others.

That dangerous faction goes by the deceptive name “progressive.”

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the difference between liberals and progressives:

Liberals.

Liberals who believe in the power of ideas.

Liberals who believe their ideas are so excellent that open debate can only help their cause.

Liberals who say “I’m okay; you’re okay.” (Progressives say, “I’m okay, you’re wrong, and you’ll be punished for your wrongness.”)

Oh, how I long for the liberalism of my youth.

A few days after I wrote that post, progressives turned against Nancy Pelosi, driving her from the stage. More proof that progressives, not liberals, are the enemies of freedom.

I previously warned that leftists are not liberals. Today, Nancy Pelosi learned that lesson. The hard way.

Nancy Pelosi had to be rushed off stage for her own safety. Safety from a mob. A mob of angry leftists. Leftists angry because Nancy condemned Antifa and ate dinner with Trump.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch writer Bill McClellan, a liberal, wrote an excellent column today. He reminds us that he’s like the liberals of my youth. The ones who might save us from the progressives. From the Antifa terrorists.

McClellan’s excellent column draws a bright line between liberal and progressive. You will enjoy reading it.

Regarding the recent progressive violence following Stockley’s acquittal, McClellan explains the difference between liberals and progressives:

I am still skeptical, but a conviction requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

Progressives seem to believe that skepticism ought to be sufficient for conviction.

After reading McClellan’s column, you’ll probably agree that we on the right can find common cause with liberals like Bill McClellan. We can find common cause in fighting back against anti-American progressives like Antifa. Those Antifa progressives are our common enemy.