Greatest 4th of July! WrestlemaniaCNNTakeDown! (Video)

Reading Time: 2 minutes

President Trump makes everything better. Everything. And this video, which he just tweeted, made this 4th of the July the best since 1776. (Click twice to get play this video)

The left and CNN will, of course, be outraged. They don’t have a sense of humor.

President Trump has a fine sense of humor. I can see the grin on his face as he tapped out “#FraudNewsCNN” and hit the send button.

I know this is very un-Christian of me, but I have to admit something. It makes me happy to know that Trump’s wrestling video will ruin the holiday for hundreds of reporters, editors, producers, Hollywood outrage pornographers, and Never Trumpers. Ruin their holiday. I can see Jim Acosta screaming at his wife across the kitchen table now. “Why no corn-on-the-cob? Why no corn-on-the-cob? Why no corn-on-the-cob?” He might even get a drink thrown in his face.

Some will say that a video like this one is beneath the president. Sanctimonious puffery. Bill Clinton sort of blew those standards of decorum.

Besides, everybody who ever said they wanted new blood and fresh faces in politics? This is what non-political outsiders look like. They don’t play by your old rules because those rules were meant to preserve the elites. The rules of decorum you worry about were designed to keep Tea Partiers barefoot and parading, not winning elections. Those old rules from the 19th century were written to keep the common rabble (rabble like you, me, and Trump) away from politics.

When we stormed the steps of the Arch in 2009, we became the battering ram striking the first blow into the gates of the palace. When Donald J. Trump took the oath of office in January 2017, those palace gates swung open. Just as the American army of rabble and peasants humiliated the great British Empire at Yorktown 236 years ago.

Cornwallis’s words in The Patriot are Jeff Zucker’s words today. (Click anywhere on the video to play)

Everything has changed. Everything except the elite’s contempt for the people who make America great.

Keep tweeting, Mr. President. Your enemies deserve it.

UPDATE:

  1. The Gateway Pundit reacts.
  2. CNN reacts like Cornwallis
  3. Scott Adams perfectly explains the entire matter in few words:

 

The Best We Can Do: Freedom and Independence For America

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Tim Gerrity: We may not always get what we want. We may not always get what we need. Just so’s we don’t get what we deserve!

–True Colors, 1991

Do you ever get the feeling we’re getting exactly what we deserve?

As the Crisis deepens, 13ers will feel little stake in the old order, little sense that their names and signatures are on the social contract. They will have reached full adult maturity without ever having believed in either the American Dream or American exceptionalism. They will never have known a time when America felt good about itself, when its civic and cultural life didn’t seem to be decaying. From childhood into midlife, they will have always sensed that the nation’s core institutions mainly served the interests of people other than themselves. Not many of their classmates and friends will have built public-sector careers, apart from teaching and police work. Most 13ers will have oriented their lives around self-help networks of friends and other ersatz institutions that have nothing to do with government.

–Howe, Neil; Strauss, William (2009-01-16). The Fourth Turning

It’s easy for Americans in the 21st century to believe we deserve better. Some people say everyone deserves free education through college, free medical care, free food, free transportation, free contraceptives, even free tampons. Maybe “deserve” is the wrong word. “Right to” is what people actually say.

What if we don’t?

Let’s play a thought experiment.

What if you woke up tomorrow on a tropical island. It’s not tiny, but it’s not too big. You find lots of tropical plants and animals but no other people. You are alone on an island. All alone in paradise.

Being alone, you won’t find a doctor or a professor. No stores to shop. No contraceptives. And no one to use them with. You are alone with yourself and all of your natural rights.

Sure, there’s no one to talk to, no one to kiss, no one to love, no one to comfort you. But there’s also no one to boss, no one to bully, no one to enslave, no one to rob. Just you.

On this paradise island surrounded by food that you can harvest yourself, you feel completely in charge of yourself. Perhaps for the first time in your life. There are no license bureaus to visit, no security lines to wait in. You pay no taxes.

You have all of your rights. You have a right to an education, but you can’t force someone to teach you. You must teach yourself to survive on the island.

You have the right to shelter, but you probably have to build one yourself. Or build twenty if you want.

You have the right to health, but you have to treat yourself. (What do the animals do when they get injured? How do they heal themselves?)

You have the right to eat, but you have to harvest the food yourself. (What do the animals eat? How do they get it?)

You have the right to transportation: your legs. You may crawl if you wish. No one there to laugh.

You have everything you deserve: your freedom and total independence.

You probably wish someone were there with you, but company comes at a price, does it not?

One day, long after you’ve developed routines and practices to ensure your safety, nourishment, and maximum happiness under the circumstances, something catches your eye. Out on the ocean between the horizon and the shore you spot an object. It’s large and different from anything you’ve seen since waking up on your island.

Over the next hour or two, the object gets bigger as it drifts closer to your island. Soon you see the object is a raft of some sort. Yellow. Crowded onto the raft are seven people. Some begin waving, so they must have seen you. They drift closer and closer and you can hear them shouting. You cant make out their words over the surf and the breeze, but you know they’re trying to talk to you.

In a moment the raft reaches shallow water. You wade out to help bring the craft ashore. You are no longer alone. You have company.

Everyone on the raft speaks the same language you speak. One of the “rafters,” the word you use to describe these visitors, is a doctor. One is a professor. Another is a former legislator. The other four are a young family consisting of a carpenter, his wife (a receptionist) and their two children, one boy and one girl.

“How long have you been here?” the politician asks.

“Huh. I’m not sure,” you answer. “A couple years, I guess.”

“And you’re alone?” the doctor asks.

“As far as I know,” you say. “I’ve pretty much explored the whole island, and I’ve never found signs of other people.”

“How have you survived?” asks the professor.

You start to tell stories of your time on the island. How you panicked at first, but then learned to live.

“I was so angry for a while. I though I didn’t deserve this. I felt deprived and lonely. And, honestly, scared. I had no idea how to survive out here. But I realized I had to eat, so I taught myself how to gather coconuts and pineapples and a lot of berries and plants I saw the animals and birds eating. I stay away from all the snakes and lizards because there’s no telling which ones are dangerous. I built shelters for myself around the island so I’d never be caught out without protection. I figured out how to spear fish–there’s so many fish in the waters here, it’s easy.”

“How do you cook?” the doctor asked.

“I don’t.”

“You’re lucky to be alive,” the doctor continued. “You could get all kinds of parasites and bacteria from raw fish. You should know better.”

“We need to figure out a way to make fire,” the politician said. Then, turning to you, “Since you’ve been here for two years, I think you should figure that out. You know this island better than anyone.”

“I agree,” said the professor. “I can tell you what might work.”

“Okay, but I don’t really need fire,” you say. “I’ve survived without it for two years. If I knew how to do it, I’d have done it.”

“Well, we need some organization, then,” said the politician. “Why don’t we take a vote?”

They vote. The professor and the politician decide that only adults may vote. The carpenter and his wife abstain, but the doctor, the professor, and the politician vote that you are responsible for finding a way to make fire. They also decide that you must teach them which plants are edible and which are not and to make a map of the island so the others can find their way around.

In the next few days, the group makes a lot of other decisions, all by vote. Your days get busier and busier trying to fulfill all the obligations the rafters dumped on you. Because you’re the most experienced, you gather most of the food. You help the carpenter build shelter for the others. (The professor decided your existing shelters were inadequate.) The rafters form a government of which the former legislator is the head.

You work day after day gathering firewood, building materials, food, and fresh water while the doctor, the professor, and the politician spend most of their days deciding new rules that mostly apply only to you and the carpenter’s family. You’ve grown close to his family. Like you, they mostly do whatever the council tells them.

“Why don’t you tell them to get lost?” the receptionist asks you one day after the council decided that you may not refer to the others as “rafters.”

The receptionist had been down on the council ever sense it voted to make her two kids attend class six hours a day. She and her husbanded want the kids to learn skills useful on the island, but the professor and the politician insist they need to learn other things that will prepare them for college.

“Well, they vote on everything, so how can I just say ‘no?'”

“They just made up this system. Really, we’re all on our own. We don’t owe any allegiance to them,” she says.

Her husband says, “yeah, they really don’t do anything but tell us to make them comfortable. You work your butt off for them. What did you do before we got here?”

You think about this. What did you do? Woke up whenever. Caught a fish for the day’s protein. Ate berries and fruit. Explored the island. Experimented to find ways to make paper, ink, and clothes. Practiced animal and bird calls.

But since the rafters arrived, you never seem caught up. Fishing takes hours every morning, and some people don’t like all the varieties of fish. Then you and the carpenter haul water and remove waste from the little village. Then gather fruits and berries. Then mandatory school for a couple of hours in the afternoon. And village meetings. Then do it again.

You think back to the days before the rafters. You were free. You were alone, sure, but you felt whole. You appreciate the family, but the others, the experts, are really just mild slave masters. They do little work and make all the rules.


On Independence Day, remember that you had all your rights when you were alone on that island. No one grants you a new “right” without taking away someone’s freedom. You probably don’t want to benefit from slavery, do you?

America was founded on the idea that people create governments to serve them, not the other way around.


If you like truth, justice, and the American way, you might like my latest book.

Why I Am Skipping Independence Day This Year

Reading Time: 2 minutes

July 4th became my favorite holiday in 1981, replacing Christmas. Maybe it was a sign of my maturity.

flagindistress1

It was also a sign of the times.  After a ten-year hiatus, patriotism was chic again, thanks to Ronald Reagan.  Here’s a few other things that made me fall in love with Independence Day:

  • Fireworks—who doesn’t love blowing stuff up?
  • Parties
  • VP Fair (tragically renamed to Fair St. Louis)
  • Girls in bikinis
  • Beer
  • Girls in bikinis
  • and no gift-giving

That’s right, no gifts.  By seventeen, I was already tiring of the glut of gift-giving holidays and all the burdens and guilt associated with them.

But The Fourth of July was freedom day.  Freedom and liberty and redwhiteandblue everywhere you looked.

This year, America has no freedom to celebrate—Americans, no independence.  Home of the free?  Hardly.  Canada is freer than than the USA. The government in Washington spies on our farmers with drones. You call that free? The government in Washington now decides which doctors you see and whether you’re worth treating.  Free my ass.

Nor is America, really, the home of the brave.  Brave peoples drive out cowards like John Roberts; they don’t elevate the rats to Supreme Court Chief Justice.  Sometime between 1981 and 2012, we lost much our national spine. We learned to fear everything from terrorism to weather to winning.  We became immune to glory and its associated risk.

We bartered away our freedom to experts in Washington. We gave away the most precious gift God and God’s nature granted us: sovereignty over our own lives.  If we are born kings of a nation of one, as Locke said, then we have voluntarily climbed the stairs of the Tower, shackled ourselves to the cold, stone deck, and asked only that someone feed us gruel and bread and provide a blanket and reality TV now and then.

Is every American a quivering blob of helpless fear?  No. But somehow the Dr. Zachary Smiths of the world run the show now.  I saw a few of the brave at Art Hill on Thursday, but their  numbers are dwindling. Most Americans fit Tocqueville’s horrifying prophecy, circa 1838:

After having thus successively taken each member of the community in its powerful grasp and fashioned him at will, the supreme power then extends its arm over the whole community. It covers the surface of society with a network of small complicated rules, minute and uniform, through which the most original minds and the most energetic characters cannot penetrate, to rise above the crowd. The will of man is not shattered, but softened, bent, and guided; men are seldom forced by it to act, but they are constantly restrained from acting. Such a power does not destroy, but it prevents existence; it does not tyrannize, but it compresses, enervates, extinguishes, and stupefies a people, till each nation is reduced to nothing better than a flock of timid and industrious animals, of which the government is the shepherd.

I can no more celebrate the realization of that prophecy than I could celebrate a suicide. I’m going to work on July 4th this year. No parades, no bottle rockets, no parties. I can find no reason to celebrate the independence of a people who gave it back.

[For the flag-ettiquette idiots out there (aka progressives), the ensign flown upside-down is a nautical distress signal]

Thank You, Harvard

Reading Time: 2 minutes

A Harvard study recently concluded that attending American Independence Day celebrations could turn kids into Republicans.

Harvard-logos-2

The reason 4th of July creates Republicans has nothing to do with patriotism and everything to do with education.  Here’s why:

  • On July 4th, we celebrate the Declaration of Independence, not the founding of the United States.  (That would come with the passage of the Constitution thirteen years later). 
  • July 4th events teach kids—in an environment free from teacher-union propaganda—the reasons we broke from England.
  • July 4th celebrates philosophical and moral principles that establish an empowering, liberating chain of thoughts:
  • All political power resides with individual people;
  • People may voluntarily join with other people to make governments;
  • Governments have no authority except what the people, the governed, permit;
  • No person has the right to coerce another person to act
  • No government may exist with the consent of the governed;
  • People have the unalienable right to dismantle any government they choose.

Imagine, now, that you’re a fourteen year old. Your mother just made you change clothes from something you wanted to wear to something she wants you to wear. Worse, your parents are making you go to a stupid 4th of July parade when all of your friends are going swimming.

At this hot, sticky, stupid parade, a father a few feet away explains the Declaration of Independence float to a boy perched on the man’s shoulders.

“England believed that God gave us kings or queens who ruled over everyone else. Americans believe that God created people equally and that all of us rule only over ourselves.  The Declaration of Independence explained to the king of England and to the American people that we would no longer tolerate being ruled by a dictator.  We’re each going to make our own decisions about how to live.”

Take a moment this weekend to thank Harvard. They have demonstrated that conversations about liberty, freedom, individual responsibility, and equality inspire people to vote a particular way.

And those who live in ignorance of liberty, freedom, individual responsibility, and equality vote Democrat.

Related: Meditate on This: SimpleStrategies.me

Meditate on This, Why Don’t You?

Reading Time: 2 minutes

I was 18 and a college freshman. It was a Tuesday night in October. My 1970 Chevy Impala felt wide open in the fifty-degree air and the smell of freshly fallen leaves.

I drove through Forest Park feeling the rhythm of the yellow street lights as I moved between light and dark. "Memory" from Cats came on the radio. I lit a Camel (no filter).

I was free.

parkatnight

In America, we often think of independence as a collective thing. That’s bassackwards, isn’t it?

Independence is individual.

July 4th is Independence Day–the day we celebrate breaking free from Britain.  We broke from a nation, as a nation. The collective celebration makes sense.

But we did not break free because of some philosophy about groups of people; our philosophy, embodied in the Declaration of Independence, is about the rights of individual human beings.

We do need other people. We are social animals. But we are free to associate, to work with, to help or ignore those we choose.  No human being has the just authority to force any of us to associate with any other.

Independence is about people.

We broke from England to experiment with governments of our own choosing.

Independence means that I have all I need to live my life as I see best, limited only by my intrusions into others’ lives.

On Independence Day weekend, think about that. Take five minutes to meditate on the word "independence" and its personal promise to you, not to the collective.

Independence is earned.

Then take a moment and think about the threats to our independence. They abound. Our families can stifle us. The corporations we work for bind us. The debts we take on chain us. And governments at all levels shackle our bodies, hearts, and minds.

In 1838, a young French aristocrat toured the United States and wrote about his impressions. Toward the end of this two-volume collection, Tocqueville wrote about despotism in America, should it ever return. It’s a sobering, staggering premonition. Here’s a tiny sample:

Above this race of men stands an immense and tutelary power, which takes upon itself alone to secure their gratifications and to watch over their fate. That power is absolute, minute, regular, provident, and mild. It would be like the authority of a parent if, like that authority, its object was to prepare men for manhood; but it seeks, on the contrary, to keep them in perpetual childhood: it is well content that the people should rejoice, provided they think of nothing but rejoicing. For their happiness such a government willingly labors, but it chooses to be the sole agent and the only arbiter of that happiness; it provides for their security, foresees and supplies their necessities, facilitates their pleasures, manages their principal concerns, directs their industry, regulates the descent of property, and subdivides their inheritances: what remains, but to spare them all the care of thinking and all the trouble of living?

Happy 4th of July. And congratulations on your independence . . . if you can keep it.

<p><em><font size="1">Cross-posted from </font></em><a href="http://simplestrategies.me" target="_blank"><em><font size="1">SimpleStrategies.me</font></em></a>

Tax Day Tea Party and other news

Reading Time: 1

**UPDATE:  NOTHING TENTATIVE ABOUT IT**

Repeal the Pork and Cut Taxes

The next Tea Party event is April 15:  Tax Day.  Learn more at Tax Day Tea Party.  Register for the St. Louis event on FaceBook today.  Tell your friends.  Possible locations include the Old Courthouse in St. Louis, the Federal Reserve Building, and several others. 

LOCATION:  KIENER PLAZA, St. Louis, MO 63101

Repeal the Pork and Learn the Constitution

Start planning for an enormous protest on July 4, 2009.  While this is a ways off, it’s already late for planning and gaining commitments from friends, neighbors, co-workers, small business owners, and the community.  For one year, do the noble work of preserving the Republic on this holiday.  

I Hate to Ask, but . . .

To keep up with everything, I’ve incurred some unplanned expenses.  If you would like to help defray some of these costs, please use the donation tool in the right sidebar.  All donation will go toward past or future event and movement related expenses.