Browse Tag

persuasion

Persuasion and Fat

Reading Time: 5 minutes

 

The Easiest Formula for Mastering Persuasion, Losing Weight, and Avoiding Disease (video)

“Persuasion” is part of my job title. When you’re a persuasion professional, you get a lot of questions about persuasion. Some are sincere. Others are skeptical, like, “Okay, persuasion boy, persuade me to give you a hundred dollars.”

Persuasion doesn’t work like that. But it also does. Here’s the thing: if you ask me to persuade you to give me a hundred bucks, you already want to give me a hundred bucks. You want my magic to work.

Likewise, those people who pay $122 to see David Copperfield in Las Vegas want Copperfield’s tricks to work. They want to be dazzled, even if they’re skeptical. They want to try to figure out the trick, but they’d be disappointed if they did. They want to be fooled.

Persuasion isn’t about fooling people. It’s about helping people get what they want. Some people want to be amazed by David Copperfield defying the laws of physics. Some people want to give me $100. Persuasion, like stage magic, delivers.

So, let me state this unequivocally: you are free to give me $100 if you choose. I won’t try to stop you. It’s up to you. If giving me $100 means you’ll understand persuasion, go ahead. But you don’t have to give me $100 to understand how persuasion works. You can learn shortcuts. And I’ve discovered one of the best shortcuts ever.

It’s called The One-Sentence Persuasion Course by Blair Warren. 

Warren admits his method has been scientifically scrutinized. That means scientists haven’t developed a theory to explain why Warren’s method works. Then again, scientists don’t why men find Eva Longoria attractive.

LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 30: Eva Longoria attends The 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Auditorium on January 30, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. 25650_012 (Photo by Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Turner)

Now that you know Eva Longoria’s attractiveness lacks scientific theory, do you think she’s ugly?

Of course not. And the lack of scientific theory to explain Warren’s persuasion method doesn’t make it ineffective. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence, as Nassim Taleb says.

Read on to find out where to get the One-Sentence Persuasion Course for free. Actually, I’ll do it right now.

On one condition. Make that two conditions:

  1. You will read this entire PDF before reading this blog any further.
  2. You will return to this blog after you have read the PDF.

Do we have a deal? Good. Here’s the link. I’ll see you back here in a few minutes after you’ve read the PDF from top to bottom without skipping ahead.

http://www.actionplan.com/pdf/BlairWarren.pdf

What do you think? Are those the five magic bullets for persuasion?

  • encourage people’s dreams
  • justify their failures
  • allay their fears
  • confirm their suspicions
  • help them throw rocks at their enemies

Psychologists and hypnotists call this “pacing and leading.” You align yourself with your patient or subject to build rapport. Then you lead them where they want to go. Where they want to go but have been unable to motivate themselves to get there.

Personal trainers do this. People go to personal trainers because they want to get healthier and look better. Personal trainers simply get their customers out of their own way.

Example

Do you weigh 300 lbs? High blood pressure? Borderline diabetic? If so, you probably want to be thinner and healthier. You want to look good in a swimming suit. If you’re a guy, you want Eva Longoria to find you attractive. If you’re a girl, you want to look like Eva Longoria on the red carpet. But you don’t know how.

Well, it’s not your fault. You’ve been lied to about what you should eat. For decades, doctors, dietitians, the government, and popular magazines have encouraged people to eat foods that make you fat and unhealthy. Society and advertisers have told you that comfort is the goal in life.

Both lessons were lies.

Natural fat is the healthiest food you can eat. Conversely, most fruits, all sugars, all grains, all starches increase disease and obesity. Food labeled low-fat? Very bad. Breakfast cereal, oatmeal, and orange juice make you sick. And fat. Sitting six hours a day is worse than smoking a pack a day. And breakfast doesn’t matter. (You’re better off with a Bulletproof coffee.)

You’re fat because you listened to doctors and the government. You’re sick because you listened to the ads of furniture makers.

You’re overweight because society shames you into eating food that’s bad for you. How do I know this?

Last week I attended a conference at a great hotel in California. I watched a man eat a plate of scrambled eggs and bacon for breakfast. Then he got up, went to the buffet, and returned with a plate of muffins and fruit. And a tall glass of orange juice. As this man sat down, he announced, “now for the healthy stuff.”

He was wrong. The healthy stuff was on that first plate. This plate will kill him. Or give him Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s. Either way, fruit and grains are the enemies. But no one ever told him.

No one told him because there’s a lot of money in keeping people confused about healthy eating. Here’s a short list of the organizations that benefit financially from bad dieting:

Healthcare

  • Hospitals and their employees
  • American Medical Association
  • American Heart Association
  • American Cancer Society
  • All those Type II diabetes organizations
  • Pharmaceutical companies
  • Cancer treatment centers
  • Universities like Harvard and Washington University
  • Proprietary diet companies
  • Fitness centers

Agriculture

  • Corn growers
  • Sugar producers
  • Grain growers
  • Soy farmers
  • Fruit growers

Retail and CPG

  • Coke and Pepsi (and other soft drink makers)
  • Beer brewers
  • Kellogg’s (and other cereal makers)
  • Frito-Lay (and other snack makers)
  • Jenny Craig and Weight Watchers
  • Walmart (grain and sugar snacks)
  • Grocery stores (higher margins on CPG than whole foods)
  • Starbuck’s (sugary drinks have higher margins)
  • Fast food restaurant chains
  • Sit-down restaurant chains

Those lists are just off the top of my head. Every company, industry, and association mentioned benefits from bad health. If most Americans adopted a high fat, low carb diet tomorrow, all of those entities would be in deep financial trouble. And so would their lobbyists.

The reason the government tells you to eat food that causes horrible diseases is simple: lobbyists write the bills. Have you ever heard of the National Measles Foundation? No. Because measles has been pretty much wiped out. As has small pox. When a disease diminishes, funding for research disappears. A lot of people make good jack working for the various heart, cancer, and diabetes associations. They need a steady increase in those diseases to justify their existences. And the government is always happy to legislate disease into existence. For a fee.

If you want to be thin and healthy with a brain that works great, it’s as easy as a low carb, high fat eating system. You can kick it off with a 3-day water fast. (No, it’s not dangerous to go three days without food. It’s dangerous not to.)

What I Just Did

I just gave an example of Blair Warren’s method. Let’s take a look.

  • Encourage people’s dreams: I asked if you want to be thin and healthy, to look good in a swimming suit, to look like Eva Longoria. Or to date Eva Longoria. That’s the dream.
  • Justify their failures: “Well, it’s not your fault.”
  • Allay their fears: No, it’s not dangerous to go three days without food. High fat, low carb diet can reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, diabetes, and other chronic diseases.
  • Confirm their suspicions: The pop-science “healthy” eating recommendations are not just wrong but destructive. Eating what the government tells you is dangerous. Large, well-funded organizations use government to maximize their financial success. Everything labeled “healthy” and “low-fat” is bad for you.
  • Help them throw rocks at their enemies: Disease and obesity are everyone’s enemies. So are know-it-all, do-gooder organizations that shame you for eating eggs and rib eye steaks. I just loaded you up with a pocket of rocks to knock them in the head.

So, there you have it. Blair Warren’s one-sentence persuasion course. The easiest way to master the art of persuasion. It’s a simple formula for practicing pacing and leading.

Finally, $100 seems like a lot to ask. Most of this information is free on the Internet. It’s just that no one wants you to know about it. Except me and few others. If you feel guilty about getting this lifesaving information for free, you can just send ten dollars to my PayPal account:



That’s a 90 percent savings if you find this information valuable. It could save your life. And you may look better, too.

P.S. If you want to learn more about the One-Sentence Persuasion Course, check out Blair’s great book. Scott Adams recommends it. And for more on the diet that reduces disease in improves life, see dietdoctor.com and watch this video by Dr. Ted Naimen.

 

How to Destroy Radical Islam Without Firing a Shot

Reading Time: 1 minutes

You probably know that I admire Scott Adams quite a bit. He’s brilliantly predicted everything Trump has done. And he’s not finished dazzling us with his prediction skills.

Yesterday he made a prediction of how we’ll kill ISIS. It isn’t pretty. He’s not advocating what will happen. He’s just telling us what will happen.

I’m going to offer an alternative end to ISIS. It’s one I’ve advocated for attacking radical Islam since 2001. And it’s far less brutal. It’s perfect for a Master Persuader President like Trump.

Try to remember the feelings in the fall of 2001.  It’s easy. The month after 9/11 was a time of high anxiety. Amid the angst, my ex-wife asked me what I would do about radical Islam.

My answer: undermine their youth.

I went into a little detail.

I said, “corrupt their youth. Replace their religion with sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll. Destroy the dignity and authority of parents, especially fathers. Give them distractions–cell phones, computers loaded with video games. And wait 10 years.”

Today, I’d substitute smart phones for computers. (The iPhone was still six years away then.)

She responded later, saying, “but that’s what you’ve always said was ruing this country.”

“Exactly,” I said.

I like my plan better than Scott’s. Not only does mine avoid the problems of a messy genocide (followed by a lot of finger-pointing), my plan opens up new markets for American goods and services. All those Carrier air conditioners that Trump will keep coming out of Indiana need to go somewhere. What’s a better market for AC units than a desert?

If George Bush had implemented in my plan in 2001, the terror threat would be over and GDP growth would be 5 percent.

Caution: Identifying as ‘NeverTrump’ Changes Your Brain

Reading Time: 5 minutes

When a person declares himself “NeverTrump,” he thinks he’s making a political statement. Or a moral one. But he’s not. He’s making a psychological commitment that’s very difficult and painful to break.

Identity is the highest, most powerful form of persuasion. Identity also drives our decisions in parts of the brain we don’t really have conscious control over. I realize many conservatives reject brain science, but, for those of you who are open to learning, I’ll explain as best I can in a moment.

Before that, I’ll tell you that I am not a brain scientist. I’m a persuasive design strategist, and I study this stuff every day. I even work with some brain scientists. But I’m not one. So I’ll have to quote some of those professional, certified scientists to show you how this works.

Our Brains Decide Before We Do

First, our brains decide before we do. In a famous study by neuroscientists at the Max Planck Institute, researchers watched brain activity while subjects responded to images with either their left hand or their right, depending on the image. The images slowly resolved, so it took a while for the subjects to get enough information to make the decision. Here’s what happened:

By monitoring the micro patterns of activity in the frontopolar cortex, the researchers could predict which hand the participant would choose 7 SECONDS before the participant was aware of the decision.

“Your decisions are strongly prepared by brain activity. By the time consciousness kicks in, most of the work has already been done,” said study co-author John-Dylan Haynes, a Max Planck Institute neuroscientist.

Those subjects felt like they made a conscious decision, but they really didn’t. The brain decides before we do. And the brain makes its decisions, in part, based on defaults and filters we consciously implant.

Identity Is Everything to the Brain

One of the most powerful defaults we implant in our minds is identity. For example, I identify as a Blues hockey fan. I don’t know all the ways this affects my behavior, but I know it does. And I now know, after years of studying brain science, that my Blues fan identity affects my behavior in ways I will never be aware of. I’m okay with that. It’s how we’re wired.

But what does that have to do with NeverTrump? Everything.

NeverTrump is not a slogan. It’s an identity claim. Sam Gosling, a personality psychologist at the University of Texas, puts it this way on Eric Barker’s Barking Up The Wrong Tree blog:

Identity claims are deliberate statements we make about our attitudes, goals, values, etc… One of the things that’s really important to keep in mind about identity statements is because these are deliberate, many people assume we are being manipulative with them and we’re being disingenuous, but I think there’s little evidence to suggest that that goes on. I think, generally, people really do want to be known. They’ll even do that at the expense of looking good. They’d rather be seen authentically than positively if it came down to that choice.

Some people think I look like an idiot when I wear a Blues hockey sweater. I’m 52 and I haven’t played ice hockey for 15 years. But I wear it anyway because I’d rather be seen as a Blues fan than positively.

The Brain Wants to be Consistent

When someone publicly identifies as NeverTrump, he makes a commitment. And most people behave consistently with their prior commitments.

My favorite persuasion scientist, Dr. Robert Cialdini, demonstrated this phenomenon in a famous experiment.

In one posh neighborhood, very few residents were willing to place a rather ugly Drive Safely sign in their front yards. But in a similar neighborhood nearby, four times as many residents said “yes” to the sign.

The only difference between the two neighborhoods: a week before, the residents of the second neighborhood were asked to place a small postcard in their windows that read “Drive Safely.” Many of these residents agreed to the postcard. Almost all of the people who accepted the postcard also accepted the sign.

These folks had made a prior, public commitment to safe driving, so they had to “yes” to the big sign. They behaved consistently with that commitment even though they probably didn’t know why they said “yes” to the big, garish sign. They identified as pro-safe driving.

NeverTrump Is Dangerous

In my morning post, I came down pretty hard on the consequences of NeverTrumpism: increased abortions, increased racial violence, and potential assassinations. It’s all true, but I know people didn’t want to read it. If you think I was just lashing out at people I disagree with, this post might change your mind. Here’s why.

NeverTrumpers identify as NeverTrump. Some, like Jonah Goldberg and Bill Kristol, make NeverTrump their primary identity claim. In their brains, all decisions are filtered through the NeverTrump lens. We’ve already seen the science on this, so you know this is true.

As the election gets closer, their fantastical hopes of a viable third choice for president–someone other than Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump–will fade. They will realize what you and I already know and have known: the choice for president is binary. It’s crooked Hillary or Donald Trump for president. There will be no third way. 

When that happens, most NeverTrumpers will choose consistency. It won’t be a conscious choice. They’ve already surrendered their conscious decisions to the NeverTrump filter in their brains. They will feel like they’re making conscious decisions about how to vote, but they won’t be. They’ll just obey the defaults and filters they’ve implanted.

Unless they turn soon.

There’s Still Some Time

So those NeverTrumpers, to be consistent, will actively work against Donald Trump. In the voting booth, that will mean wasting their votes on a non-viable candidate. But before that, they will do whatever it takes to throw the election to Hillary Clinton. Their identity claim will demand it.

The reason I wrote such a powerful statement this morning is to warn others: be careful when making identity claims because you will become that identity. You’ll probably lose control of your decisions. And you will suffer serious emotional pain if you break from that identity, especially if you value consistency. Remember, the brain decides before we do, and the brain decides based on prior commitments. One of the most powerful commitments a person can make is an identity claim, like “NeverTrump.”

You can call my other post “tough love” if you wish, or you can call it me being a dick. I don’t care. But I do care about the damage Hillary Clinton has done and will do to this country with the help of NeverTrumpers.

After all the good they’ve done in their lives, it’d be a shame for Jonah Goldberg and Bill Kristol to be remembered as the Republicans who fed America to the Clinton wood-chipper. The NeverTrumpers are in for four emotionally painful years unless they break their self-defeating identity claims soon. And they will blame the voters, never themselves.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. NeverTrumpers can go through the pain of breaking their commitment to NeverTrumpism before the election and work to influence Trump’s administration and Congress. It will hurt for a moment, but they will be heroes in the end. I wrote a book to help them.

There’s time to turn, but that time is draining away fast. Choose wisely.

 

Use This One Word Because It Makes You More Influential

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Don’t ask me to explain why the human brain works the way it does. And don’t ask me how scientists get the idea for some experiments.

Instead, take note of the most influential work in the English language, because I want you to be more influential.

What’s that one word?

It’s not “you” or “free” or “instantly” or “new.”  They’re very powerful words, as every copywriter knows. But they’re not the most influential.

The most influential word comes from The Wizard of Oz.

Because, because, because. This is amazing science that will make you more influential

Becuz becuz becuz becuz beCUZ!

Because Is the Most Influential Word, Because It Is

Researcher Ellen Langer wanted to see how to make requests more persuasive. She had her researchers approach lines to copiers in busy offices and asked if they could go next. Each time, researchers used a very specific request: “Excuse me, I have five pages. Could I use the copier next?”

When asked this way, sixty percent of the time the people already in line let the researchers butt in. Not bad.

When the researchers added “because I’m in a rush,” the number soared from 60 percent to 94 percent!

But here’s where the word “because” really earns its stripes.  Researchers realized “because I’m in a hurry” made sense.  What if the “because” clause was meaningless.

They ran the experiment one more time, this time asking, “May I use the Xerox machine, because I have to make copies.”  Well, of course, they had to make copies. Why else would they be asking to use the Xerox machine?

You’d think such a silly request would prompt the people in line to say “get lost.”  But that didn’t happen. What did happen was astonishing, and it made the word “because” easily the most influential word in English.

When asked “May I use the Xerox machine, because I have to make copies,” 93 percent of the people in line said “sure.”

Like I said, don’t ask me to explain why the brain works this way, just remember that it does.

When you ask someone to go vote on April 2, add a because clause.  “Will you vote on April 2, because it’s an election day,” will be as effective as “will you vote on April 2, because your liberty depends on it.”

Now, go find out:

Why the Sequester Was Worse Before It Happened

How Psychological Biases Hurt Government

And here’s the book that’ll make you more influential: Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive

Source:  The Xerox studies can be found in: Langer, E., Blank, A., and Chanowitz, B. (1978). The mindlessness of ostensibly thoughtful action: The role of “placebic” information in interpersonal interaction. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 36: 639– 42. Retrieved from Goldstein, Noah J.; Martin, Steve J.; Robert B. Cialdini (2008-06-10). Yes! (Kindle Locations 2882-2884). Simon & Schuster, Inc.. Kindle Edition.