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Tea Party News

Trump Meant It All

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Trump’s enemies took refuge in the self-created narrative that his campaign was 100% American showmanship. The crooked press and the corrupt establishment, while dissing Trump publicly, scoffed privately. They “knew” his supporters were idiots and yahoos—marginally functional Neanderthals from America’s unreconstructed backwoods whose ability to think, handicapped by genetics, was further crippled by the moonshine distilled in the shed behind their putrid outhouse for personal consumption by their incest-ridden family of knuckle-dragging racist homophobes.

When Chuck Todd hears “Trump suppporter,” he pictures Jethro Bodine with rabies. The press and the establishment worked together crafting a narrative that, having fooled these moronic quirks of evolutionary retardation, Trump would seize power and become a self-serving establishmentarian. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

But, like so many times in the campaign, the press was wrong. Dead wrong. They were wrong about Trump’s supporters, they were wrong about his appeal to blacks and Hispanics, they were wrong about his appeal to women, they were wrong about his appeal to educated whites, and they were wrong about his motives. All wrong. Dead wrong. If election prognostication were the SAT of journalism, the Chuck Todds of the world would be applying to trade school now.

Peggy Noonan nailed it, as she often does:

He presented himself not as a Republican or a conservative but as a populist independent. The essential message: Remember those things I said in the campaign? I meant them. I meant it all.

Ted Cruz famously warned Trump supporters toward the end of his failed primary campaign that Donald Trump would “betray you.” Ted Cruz was wrong, too. Trump is still Trump. The showman, the provocateur, the braggart (“it ain’t braggin’ if you can back it up,” Dizzy Dean said.)

At 12:01 p.m. on January 20, the establishment expected Trump to fulfill Cruz’s prophecy by betraying the people and kissing the establishment’s ring. Imagine the cold shock that slithered down their spines when Trump began his speech with this:

Today’s ceremony however has very special meaning, because today we are not merely transferring power from one administration to the other, but from Washington, D.C. and giving it back to you, the people.

For too long, a small group in our nation’s Capitol has reaped the rewards of government while the people have borne the cost. Washington has flourished, but the people did not share in its wealth. The establishment protected itself, but not the citizens of our country.

Their victories have not been your victories.

Their triumphs have not been your triumphs.

There was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land.

That all changes starting right here and right now. This moment is your moment, it belongs to you. It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America.

In his simple, straightforward manner, Donald Trump, in his first words as President of the United States, dissolved the political bands that tied the White House to the Washington establishment and its hallelujah corner in the press. Trump divorced the office of the president from the Washington cartel and connected it to the America people.

This changes everything. And it means we, the people, must have his back. And we must have his back in a way that we’ve never had a president’s back before.

Donald Trump’s tiny team of White House staff and cabinet appointees has declared war against everything the Tea Party declared war against: both parties, the lobbyists, the press, the revolving doors, the protected incumbencies of politicians and corporations. He declared war against the powerful few by allying himself with the forgetten many.

Peggy Noonan warns us of the battle we face and odds against us:

Normally a new president has someone backing him up, someone publicly behind him. Mr. Obama had the mainstream media—the big broadcast networks, big newspapers, activists and intellectuals, pundits and columnists of the left—the whole shebang. He had a unified, passionate party. Mr. Trump in comparison has almost nothing. The mainstream legacy media oppose him, even hate him, and will not let up. The columnists, thinkers and magazines of the right were mostly NeverTrump; some came reluctantly to support him. His party is split or splitting. The new president has gradations of sympathy, respect or support from exactly one cable news channel, and some websites.

He really has no one but those who voted for him.

Do they understand what a lift daily governance is going to be, and how long the odds are, with so much arrayed against him, and them?

I think we do.

When fifty thousand people in 58 locations responded on just four days notice to protest the establishment’s bailouts on February 27, 2009, we faced similar odds. On “Your World with Neil Cavuto” aired that afternoon, Neil talked to organizers of various Tea Party protests. (Plus lots of video footage from St. Louis.) It’s worth revisiting because Cavuto used the term “populist” to describe the events. He also questioned whether this would be a movement that resulted in change or if we would remain a “very vocal minority.”

On Friday, January 20, 2017, Mr. Cavuto got his answer.

We are winning.

 

Photo credit: Respublica: http://respublica.typepad.com/respublica/2009/02/tea-party-in-st-louis.html

Welcome to the America of Our Dreams

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Jim Durbin called me this evening. “Are you excited?” he asked.

Jim was in the crowd at the very first Tea Party in St. Louis, February 27, 2009. A cold Friday. He and more than a thousand other folks took off work and school to see what this protest was all about. Like so many others, Jim knew America needed a change. A big one. A change built on the hopes and dreams and fierce independence of ordinary people. We could no longer trust America’s future to academics and political professionals.

“Excited bout what?” I asked.

“The inauguration tomorrow,” he said.

I’d almost forgotten. Between my never-ending cold and work and family and the Blues’ lackluster home play, so many other things compete for my brain time. I felt bad that I didn’t feel better. Which reminded me of a story we read in 7th grade (was it 7th?) about Christmas spirit and a little kid who didn’t have any.

The kid in that Christmas story was struck by Christmas spirit on Christmas eve. My epiphany struck when I opened some old emails.

These emails were responses to a “thank you” email I sent to Tea Partiers in November. My email thanked them for being part of the movement that culminated in a 1,000 seat shift from Democrats to Republics since 2009 at all levels of state and federal government including, now, the seat in the Oval Office. That email was to thank the people like Jim who no longer trusted academics and professionals to chart a course for America’s future.

As Donald Trump prepares to take office as our 45th President and the first of a kind, I thought I’d share a few of your words with the world. You say it better than I ever could:

Don’t you see that the Tea Party was the precursor of Donald Trump’s election? We laid the groundwork with all those rallies and protests and afterparties.  If Trump is faithful to his word and follows through with his promises to us, the ideals that we struggled for will come to fruition. Back in April of 2009 when I went to the Kiener Plaza rally, I KNEW that the Tea Party would be an historic movement, that we could make a difference.  God bless you and, yes, Dana too, for helping us to take America back. God bless Donald Trump and God Bless America! — Donna R.

It finally feels good after all these past 8 years. God bless you Bill. — Edward H.

I heard someone recently say what happened to the Tea Party and I said we are the Tea Party.  You were such a prominent part of the entire movement.  Thank you for the reminders.  I have a photo album with many of the events.  I truly feel like there is a dark cloud removed from our future.  However, we can never take this great country for granted.  God has answered our prayers and now we need to be worthy.  Thank you for all the passion there is no replacement and money cannot buy it. –Jane P.

Some of us have complained or protested when someone implied that the Tea Party is dead. I don’t think it was ever dead – it went underground and that’s where it continued its mission of upsetting the apple card and unconventional methods of doing things the unconventional way.

Thanks for recognizing that MAGA is and was the ultimate goal of the Tea Party. –Frieda K.

God Bless America and please make it great again! –Judy H.

I received dozens of other notes that mistakenly thanked me. I really didn’t do much, but I appreciate your kind support and kind words.

Shakespeare said, “It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.” Fifteen hours from the moment I write these words, the Tea Party’s dream will rendezvous with its hard-earned destiny. That destiny, far too big for one man to contain, will nonetheless be personified by Donald J. Trump.

On this last night of America’s dark winter, I will tell you that Mr. Trump said it best when he told the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial tonight:

I had something to do with it but you had much more to do with it than I did. I’m the messenger. I’m just the messenger. And we were tired, and I love you. Believe me, I love you.

Thank you, friends. I look forward to laying down our tools of protest so we can pick up hammers and shovels and get to work Making America Great Again!

How Donald Trump Completed the Tea Party

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Sometimes I forget what originally drove me to call for a tea party protest in St. Louis.

One motivation was fear of missing out because a dozen other cities were planning protests. Another driver was a desire change the direction of the country. And at least some of it was the frustrated actor in me looking for an outlet.

Since two-thirds of those motivations appeal only to me, let’s focus on the middle one: change the country.

If we wanted to change the country, we have to answer obvious questions:

  1. From what?
  2. To what end?

I’ll try to unpack those two questions and show why Tuesday’s election means the Tea Party’s mission is almost complete.

From What?

Here are the RealClearPolitics afternoon headlines from Thursday, February 19, 2009:
Mr. President, Enough with Doomsday Talk – Mark McKinnon, Daily Beast
Fixing Our Housing Crisis – Tim Geithner & Shaun Donovan, USA Today
People Don’t Want to Pay Their Neighbor’s Mortgage – Rick Santelli, CNBC
How the World Sees Obama – Joe Klein, Time
My Response to the Attorney General – Bill Willingham, Big Hollywood
Welcome to Canada, Mr. President! – Margaret Wente, Globe & Mail
The RAT Hiding Inside Stimulus Bill – Byron York, Washington Examiner
Time for a Global Stimulus – Matthew Yglesias, The American Prospect
Durban II: High-Level Diplomacy? **- Rick Richman, Commentary
**Paterson’s Bumpy Road
– Kyle Trygstad, RealClearPolitics

Stimulus, bailouts, doomsday talk.

As we saw it back then, the expert elites screwed up the world and they wanted us to pay for it. TARP and Stimulus were code words for wealth redistribution. This time, though, we taxed the poor to make the wealthiest people whole.

When Obama announced plans to bail out people upside-down on their mortgages, we’d had enough.

That first Nationwide Chicago Tea Party Protest was the plebes first warning shot across the elitist’s bow.

The “from what” was a world run poorly by a select few. Years later, Peggy Noonan named that select few: “the protected.”

To What End?

From the first moment of the tea party movement, we struggled to answer this question. “To what end?” my friend Lee Presser asked me over lunch. “You’ve started this movement, Bill,” he said. “You need to tell people what the world will look like when you succeed.”

Lee was right, of course. Every movement must work toward something. We needed a way to measure our progress toward a goal.

Just saying “no” will work for only so long. Eventually, someone would demand to know our solution. At least our vision.

Many tea partiers said “constitutionally limited government,” but no one can draw a picture of one. And, frankly, no one really cares about government. We care about the part of life separate from government. We wanted more of that non-government life and less government. But “less government” is a bad answer because it doesn’t anwer the question most people ask.

To people like me, less government means something good. To someone on disability and SSI, less government means something scary and dangerous. And, while we, on the right, have high confidence that those welfare recipients will find a way to survive without government programs, the people dependent on those programs often have less confidence in themselves.

For years, we struggled to paint a picture of “Tea Party America.” We failed. We all failed. As a result, the tea party movement fractured. Some went on to media careers. Some got elected. Most of us worked on smaller tasks, like municipal court reform.

Then, a New York billionaire did our jobs for us.

To Make America Great Again

The answer to “to what?” came from a simple slogan: make America great again. And it came, not from a tea party leader, but from a billionaire real estate mogul and reality TV star. Donald Trump finally painted a simple picture for the people Peggy Noonan calls “the unprotected.”

As Ms. Noonan writes today:

Those who come to this space know why I think what happened, happened. The unprotected people of America, who have to live with Washington’s policies, rebelled against the protected, who make and defend those policies and who care little if at all about the unprotected. That broke bonds of loyalty and allegiance. Tuesday was in effect an uprising of the unprotected. It was part of the push-back against detached elites that is sweeping the West and was seen most recently in the Brexit vote.

The tea party was the uprising of the unprotected. Over the first two years of that uprising, we lost our focus as we groped for the answer to the “to what?” question. The answer that seemed most appealing came from the Constitution experts. Ted Cruz became their hero. They pushed Constitution study groups.

But all that academic talk about the Constitution bored the unprotected. As I wrote in 2015, most people don’t know they have a Constitution problem—they think they have an income problem. Our 10th Amendment arguments didn’t pay their rent. Most of all, they didn’t want someone or something to pay their rent; they wanted to earn enough to pay it themselves.

Then along came Trump. “We’re gonna make America great again, folks. We’re gonna do it. Believe me. It’ll be beautiful.”

How would we do this?

“We’re going to bring your jobs back. Good factory jobs.”

“Law and order.”

“We’re going to build the wall, and it will be beautiful. And Mexico will pay for the wall, believe me.”

And Trump said more.

Trump Answers the Question

While the media perseverated on a few controversial tweets and comments, Trump spoke to the people who built and build America. Trump spoke in simple, truthful words:

I think the big problem this country has is being politically correct. I’ve been challenged by so many people, and I don’t frankly have time for total political correctness. And to be honest with you, this country doesn’t have time either.

So we really need jobs now. We have to take jobs away from other countries because other countries are taking our jobs. There is practically not a country that does business with the United States that isn’t making – let’s call it a very big profit. I mean China is going to make $300 billion on us at least this year.

When I am president, I will work to ensure that all of our kids are treated equally and protected equally. Every action I take, I will ask myself, ‘Does this make life better for young Americans in Baltimore, Chicago, Detroit, Ferguson, who have as much of a right to live out their dreams as any other child America?’

Our politicians are stupid. And the Mexican government is much smarter, much sharper, much more cunning. And they send the bad ones over because they don’t want to pay for them. They don’t want to take care of them. Why should they when the stupid leaders of the United States will do it for them?

Our military has to be strengthened. Our vets have to be taken care of. We have to end Obamacare, and we have to make our country great again, and I will do that.

I own buildings. I’m a builder; I know how to build. Nobody can build like I can build. Nobody. And the builders in New York will tell you that. I build the best product. And my name helps a lot.

The problems we face now – poverty and violence at home, war and destruction abroad will last only as long as we continue relying on the same politicians who created them in the first place.

We will make America strong again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And we will make America great again.

There it is, my friends. Donald Trump answered Lee Presser’s question, “to what end?”

I’ve said many, many times that throughout our charmed history, God has always given us the President we needed and deserved. If you can get beyond party and ideology, Bill Clinton fit the 1990s the way Ronald Reagan fit the 1980s. Jimmy Carter was the embodiment of the mid-1970s, and his failed president made Reagan possible. In time, I think we’ll see that Barack Obama made Donald Trump possible.

Possible. But Donald Trump and the tea party put Trump into office. I realize some tea partiers opposed Trump. That’s beside the point. Some conservatives like George F. Will opposed Reagan. The tea party movement was not monolithic.

But if you go back to day one of the tea party, February 27, 2009, and you look at the faces and fashion of the people who gathered on the steps of the Arch, you will see Trump’s people.

Donald Trump gave us the vision that eluded me and all the other tea party leaders. Maybe we were too knowledgable and tried to craft a clever vision.

Trump’s vision was simple: make America great again.

That’s all it took and all that matters. We just wanted to make America great again.

God bless and keep President-elect Trump.

Why Is Erick Erickson Protecting Reince Priebus?

Reading Time: 3 minutes

UPDATE:

Welcome, Donald Trump fans! Thanks for reading.

Yes, it’s true, I have had disagreements with Erick in the past. I try to assess the situation, not just the person. It’s possible to disagree with someone on one subject and to agree with them on another.

If anything, Erick showed consistency by rescinding Trump’s invitation to Red State. Erick didn’t want the event to descend into chaos led by my friends over the Barbour episode; he doesn’t want a descent into chaos led by Donald Trump.

Some will call me a hypocrite. Go ahead. I’ve been called worse. And being seen as inconsistent on this matter is better, in my view, than siding with boorishness in an attempt to appear narrowly consistent some marginally important prior position. If I must be narrowly and reflexively consistent, I will remain consistent with my belief that the United States deserves and requires leaders of remarkable character, temperament, intelligence, creativity, and charm. I want it all in my next president. And Trump lacks several key ingredients.

Please continue reading. Thanks


Call it the hand of God.

I was supposed to go to RedState Gathering this weekend, but things didn’t work out at the list minute. Now, I’m glad I wasn’t there.

Red State Gathering is blogger Erick Erickon’s annual conservative gabfest. This year, it was in Ft. Worth, Texas.

Reince Priebus and Erick Erickson at RedState. Photo by anonymous Tea Partier

Reince Priebus, RNC Chairman, was one of the speakers. Priebus is under heavy pressure from Missouri’s Ed Martin and others to investigate Henry Barbour’s role in political attack ads that accuse the Tea Party of racism. So far, Priebus has blocked any such investigation.

Reince Priebus is running cover for Thad Cochran and Henry Barbour who called you, dear read, racist.

Traditionally, speakers at events like RedState Gathering take questions from the audience. But Erickson saw that Tea Party Patriots were armed with signs and tough questions for the Priebus .

I asked Erickson, via Twitter, why he protected Priebus from questions. Here’s Erick’s response.

Erickson’s answer is nonsense. No, Priebus did not authorize Henry Barbour’s attack on the Tea Party. He is not responsible for Barbour’s actions. 

But Priebus is solely responsible for his own response to irrefutable evidence that Henry Barbour funded the ads. Erickson has made himself culpable in the cover-up by protecting Priebus who is protecting Barbour. (Priebus and Barbour go way back, as we shall see later.) It’s typical Republican Establishment “cover your ass” nonsense.

Erickson has not responded to my follow-up question: 

Priebus is Chairman of the RNC, for God’s sake. He’s in charge. He needs a blogger to protect him from Tea Party Patriots? Give me a break.

Enter Ed Martin, Stage Right

Meanwhile, Missouri GOP Chairman, Ed Martin, has risked his entire political future by filing motions of censure against Henry Barbour and the Mississippi Republicans who shamefully libeled tea partiers, plagiarizing the vilest tactics from the Al Sharpton playbook.

I realize it’s considered bad form to set up a guest for humiliation in some circles. I get that. But if you’re going to allow Priebus to speak, you have to let him feel the heat for his failure to investigate the shenanigans in Mississippi. By blocking the investigation, Priebus is protecting the bad actors and further alienating grassroots conservatives.

Of course, we all know why Priebus won’t investigate Mississippi. As the Spectator pointed out, Henry Barbour and Reince Priebus are old buddies:

Martin’s request for an investigation would be, one thinks, a no-brainer. This is, after all, the party of Lincoln. Race baiting has no place in the Republican Party, which came to be in the first place because of its staunch opposition to slavery.

But there’s a problem: Take a look at this link to a site for a lobbying group called Capital Resources, which includes a bio for one of the group’s partners, the aforementioned Henry Barbour. If you scan down a bit there is a series of bullet points describing Barbour’s background. The very first one reads as follows: “Helped run RNC Chairman Reince Priebus’ campaign for chairman.”

Here’s the most depressing part of this whole sordid story. When faced with the choice of offending the Tea Party or the Establishment, Erickson decided to protect the Establishment.

Maybe Erickson was just being a good and gracious host. That’s what I want to think. But to those of us who’ve been in the streets fighting the establishment, this feels like another sell-out.

Ed Martin Moves to Censure Henry Barbour Over Racist Mississippi Ads

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Go Ed!

A few weeks ago, hunkered down at my laptop in my hotel room in Jacksonville, Florida. I was exhausted from seven hours of travel and a time change. But I had to take a moment to recognize Ed Martin’s commitment to all the best the Republican Party stands for.

Ed is determined to expose the GOP establishment’s willingness to do anything to destroy grassroots insurgents. Thad Cochran’s forces in Mississippi threw ethics, morality, and decency to the wind in their quest to stop a Tea Party candidate from unseating the 128-term Cochran.

So I can’t tell you how proud I was when I saw this Daily Caller article by Missouri GOP Chairman, Ed Martin. He explains why he wants the GOP to censure Barbour:

I’ve been asked why I’m involved in Mississippi. I’m not. I’m involved in Missouri, where the use of racist political ads is a common Democratic campaign trick. The most relevant was in 2004, when the George Soros-funded 527 organization, America Coming Together, distributed a flyer with an image of a black man being hosed by a white fireman. The text next to the image linked U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft (a Missouri Republican) with an effort to keep African American voters from the polls

While a Democrat has acknowledged placing some of the racist ads in Mississippi, Martin points out that Henry Barbour–a Cochran crony–has dirty hands, as well.

In Mississippi this June, Henry Barbour’s PAC funded ads by a man named Bishop Crudup with the same lie. Using images from the Civil Rights era, one Barbour flyer states that the “Tea Party intends to prevent you from voting.” The flyer was heavily distributed to black neighborhoods in clear echoes of the Soros-funded message against Republicans in 2004. The Democrats and their operatives with bylines in the media regularly accuse Republicans of voter suppression. This is the first time in my experience that a Republican has done so.

When Tea Partiers see such despicable behavior from big-name Republican establishment figures, we worry that we were used in 2009 and 2010. For the record, we delivered the House to the GOP that year, denied Obama a filibuster-proof majority in the Senate.

Here’s Ed’s specific action:

I have filed two resolutions for the RNC members to consider at our meeting this week. One censures Henry Barbour for his role in the race-baiting ads. The other censures any Republicans who were involved in the racist ads. I hope my fellow RNC members consider this serious matter carefully and state forcefully that we will not tolerate racist conduct by any of our members.

Ed Martin will need our support more than ever. Please don’t confuse him with the Republican establishment. His noble fight for justice in Mississippi shows his mettle.

Go, Ed!

UPDATE: ConservativeHQ has a great story on Ed’s noble effort

7 Fascinating Results In The Missouri Primary

Reading Time: 3 minutes

CORRECTION: My sincerest apologies for an inexcusable error in this post earlier. I erroneously congratulated my friend Martin Baker in the US House 1st District primary. I understand that Martin was about 500 votes short. I failed to verify information I received on the race, and I apologize for my irresponsibility.

Well, this got people talking. (See the comments.)

Yesterday was the Missouri Primary. Congratulations to Rick Stream and Jay Ashcrofton their wins in contested races for St. Louis County Executive and State Senate District 24, respectively. Both men face important races in November, and I’m proud to support each of them. The only one I can vote for is Rick Stream, and I will do so with gusto. (Make that a long “u” in “gusto” and it rhymes.)

Now, for some interesting numbers. Most of the comparisons are to the 2010 primary, the most recent non-presidential Congressional election year.

St. Louis County Is Losing Voters

Source: St. Louis County Board of Elections

I know Charlie Dooley drove a lot of people out of the county during his reign of error, but I was a little shocked to see
registered voters down by over 12,000 since 2010. Registrations are also down 2,600 since 2012. Are you startled that the county’s lost 10,000 voters in just two years? Maybe MOPP’s voter roll clean-up efforts had something to do with it. I’d love to know if those losses are concentrated in a particular area or party, or if they’re evenly distributed.

Republican Ballots Were Way Down, Too

Source: St. Louis County Board of Elections
Yes, the Democrat race for County Executive drew a lot of attention, and I’ve received some anecdotal evidence of Republicans crossing over to vote in that race. But I expected the combination of low Democrat voter enthusiasm and the Amendments to draw Republicans and right-leaning independents to the polls. Didn’t happen. Which tells me GOP voter enthusiasm is really low. But look at the trends. Since 2010, Democrat ballots have inched up while Republican ballots have dropped.

I realize that the dynamics are different every year, but that GOP drop seems worrisome. Or maybe the Tea Party effect in 2010 skewed that year’s numbers. Still, with a 12,000 drop in registrations and consistent drop in Republican ballots, the St. Louis County GOP should be concerned.

 Amendment 5 Failed in St. Louis County But Passed Overwhelmingly Statewide

Amendment 5 protects Missourians from 2nd Amendment abuses by the state and by the federal government. (And there was some spirited debate on that issue in the comments, too. With the big Democrat vote surge in St. Louis County, you might have expected that Amendment to suffer. And it did. County voters were out of step with the rest of the state with Nays 59 percent to Yeas 41, the mirror of the statewide vote of 61-39 Yea.

The “Right to Farm” Amendment Barely Passed

I called this the “meh” Amendment. My friend Ed Martin was strongly in favor, but I really don’t think the courts will let it stand. It’s basically just an affirmation of our love of farmers, which I agree with. But the language is as vague as Obama’s patriotism. I expected it to pass fairly easily, but it passed only 50.2 to 49.8.

The Tea Party and the ACLU Can Make Beautiful Music Together

I know a lot of people on the right have issues with the ACLU, but we probably have more in common with the organization than we have differences. So I was proud to fully endorse Amendment 9 to extend 4th Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure to electronic data. And that Amendment blew everything out of the water with 75 percent voting Yes.

Missouri Doesn’t Want More Boondoggle Projects

Very glad to see Missourians shot down the so called “transportation sales tax” increase. The 3/4 cent sales tax hike, purportedly to fix ailing roads and bridges, would have been the biggest tax hike in Missouri’s history. Luckily, a lot of mayors and county executives tipped their hands and let us know they planned to build greenways, parks, bike trails, and butterfly houses with money. And Show-Me Institute informed us that Missouri’s roads are in the top 10 in the whole country. That money-grab failed 59 to 41 percent. The only bad news on this Amendment was that Jay Nixon agreed with us.

Missouri Is Turning Libertarian

The combined results on Amendments 1, 5, 7, and 9 show that Missouri, like much of the country, is becoming more libertarian. That’s good news. Libertarians (lower case L) distrust government and other large institutions. We oppose crony capitalism and favor free market capitalism. We believe that people created the government, and people can tell the government its just powers. While many of my fellow pro-lifers dislike some of the libertarian social stands, if we don’t reign in government abuses of civil liberties, our views on abortion and other issues won’t really matter. Because we won’t be allowed to voice them.

On To November

But first, let’s take some time to remind our Congressional delegation that we won’t tolerate extending Export-Import Bank. In fact, I’d caution some of our Republican Congresspeople to look at yesterday’s results carefully. A lot of traditional Republican voters–including those who provided that GOP surge in 2010–are ready to bolt in November. And I’m one of them. Missourians are notorious ballot splitters, and voting Libertarian on a few races might be just the message our Washington delegation needs.